FAQs

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Results of Request for Pedestrian Crossing on Academy and Beaverbrook

Analysis of the pedestrian count data indicates that the crossing volume at this location is below the minimum threshold for further consideration of pedestrian crossing control based on the guidelines approved by the by the Standing Policy Committee on Infrastructure Renewal and Public Works on January 11, 2013 (Minute No. 41).  Review of the collision history for the most recent 10 year period indicates there have been no reported pedestrian-vehicle collisions at the intersection of Academy Road and Borebank Street.

Based on the information above, the Winnipeg Public Service does not recommend the installation of pedestrian crossing control at the intersection of Academy Road and Borebank Street at this time.  However, we have added this location as a candidate to the Pedestrian Crossing Control Priority List so that it can be reviewed again relative to other locations in the future.

 

Categories: Public Safety, Traffic

FAQs on Rail Line Rationalization

River Heights remains one of the best places to live in Winnipeg and it can be even better without rail lines.

The rail companies that run lines through this great neighbourhood have proposed increasing the usage of their lines and building facilities to unload rail cars onto trucks right in the middle of River Heights. This is a very serious issue for us all.

This potential increased use and the addition of transloading stations raise serious safety, noise and traffic concerns. The industrial use of the land negativity impacts our predominately residential neighbourhood.

To ensure that this does not happen, I've been working with the stakeholders to facilitate a rail line rationalization plan that would provide the opportunity to have BNSF and possibly CP abandon their spur line and withdraw plans to build a transloading station just north of Grant Avenue and/or reduce the use of the line(s).

Many of you have told me that the issue of rail line rationalization matters to you and that you have many questions about the process and how it is developing.

The City of Winnipeg and I, as your city councillor, have taken an active role in representing your concerns and questions to the federal government because the land use authority over these lands rests with them, not City Hall. So keep the questions coming and I will continue getting information for you.

I've listed some answers to questions I've been asked and I hope it helps you understand why it is important that we all work together to support rail line rationalization.

 

Q: What is rail line rationalization?

A: Rail line rationalization is the practice of rail companies sharing tracks to reach a destination, in this case CentrePort Canada. This activity can open the door for the decommissioning of spur lines, like those that go through River Heights.

 

Q: What is a transloading station?

A: A transloading station is a designated area where trains stop to load and unload their cargo to trucks or into storage, like the silos between Grant Avenue and Taylor Avenue. This is an industrial activity.

  

Q: If rail relocation happens, what happens to these lands?

A: This question can only to be answered once the issue of rationalization has been addressed; otherwise we are putting the cart before the horse. If rail rationalization does not happen and/or if only one or none of the rail lines are abandoned, the point is mute. I understand that the potential use of these lands is of interest to us all and, as such, the City of Winnipeg will consult with the neighborhood before any decisions are made.

 

Q: Why is it important that rail rationalization happens?

A: The recently announced task force that will study the potential relocation and rationalization of rail lines is part of my continuing efforts to ensure rail line lands in River Heights are not used for transloading operations, storage of dangerous material and increasingly transporting more dangerous material through residential neighbourhoods.

The study is a critical part of an overall strategy to have BNSF relocate three transloading areas, one active (Grant Avenue to Taylor Avenue) and two planned (Corydon Avenue to Grant Avenue) to CentrePort Canada.

 

Q: What started rail line rationalization discussions in River Heights?

A: In 2013, the rail lines had plans in place and were moving towards imminent opening of one of the planned transloading sites off Grant Avenue. It was through the activation of discussions about rail line rationalization that the plans were put on hold, pending the outcome of discussions.

 

Q: Why are there concerns about this situation?

A: The potential increase in the use of the BNSF track, the industrial activity present at the active transloading station at Tayor Avenue, the planned transloading station for Grant Avenue and the potential for another transloading station at Corydon Avenue is an issue for all. The concerns are:

  • The increased use of the rail lines to transport unknown, potentially dangerous, materials which could include petroleum products and chemicals through River Heights
  • The potential increase of storage of empty containers that have been used to transport similar products and chemicals
  • The noise, smell and dust created by transferring materials from trains to trucks at any time of day
  • The impact on traffic associated with the additional 30 trucks going in and out of the transloading station
  • The increase in the number of trains using the tracks
  • Trains blocking the tracks at intersections, backing up traffic along our regional routes and causing more traffic to reroute to residential roads

 The effect of the proposed transloading station will be felt far beyond those whose property backs onto the tracks.

 

Q: Who owns the rail lines? Who has authority/jurisdiction over them?

A: The rail lines are owned by CP and BNSF, while the transloading lands are owned by BNSF. The federal government has sole jurisdiction over rail lands. This means that the City of Winnipeg cannot enforce zoning or regulatory by-laws over these lands, including use of, movement and storage of dangerous materials, noise control, etc.

The lands are governed by the Federal Transportation Act as the rail lines were established prior to Winnipeg’s growth around them. The lands are protected so that the rail companies can continue to use them for rail line operations.

 

Q: Have you challenged the federal jurisdiction?

A: Yes, when the silos were installed. The City of Winnipeg proceeded with a court challenge related to the placement of storage silos. It was lost (http://orlikow.ca/news/view/451) and the courts clearly gave jurisdiction of rail lands to the federal level of government.

 

Q: Is there broad support for rail rationalization?

A: I have been working on this project for a few years and recently was able to get provincial support and funding to consider rail line rationalization. It is a complex issue that requires subject knowledge and buy-in from the rail lines.

 If you have further questions, please contact me at my office 204-986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@winnipeg.ca.

Categories: City Hall, Development, Infrastructure

FAQ: What is Spring Road Clean-Up and How Long Does it Take?

Q: What is spring clean-up?

A: Spring clean-up activities involve removing the build-up of street debris that collects during the winter months from roads and boulevards. 

 

Q: How long does spring clean-up take?

A: Up to six weeks, depending on weather conditions.

 

Q: When does it start?

A: Street sweeping starts when the roads are clear of snow and the overnight temperatures remain above freezing.

 Boulevard sweeping starts when there are no frozen or wet boulevard surfaces, or approximately a week or two after street sweeping begins.

 

Q: I have excessive sand and gravel sand on my boulevard. What do I do? 

A: If your boulevard has an unusually large amount of debris (two wheelbarrows full or more), call or email 311@winnipeg.ca to request an inspection.

 

Q: Does the city sweep back lanes?

A: Yes, paved back lanes are swept once a year. The program begins after streets are swept in spring.

 

Q: Will there be parking restrictions? How will I know?

A: Temporary “No Parking” signs will be placed in advance in various areas. Please note that not all streets will be signed during spring clean-up. The city will only place signs on the streets where parked vehicles present a problem to street cleaning.

 Daytime Sweeping

  • Parking prohibited from 9:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Signs will be placed by 9:00 p.m. the previous evening

 Evening Sweeping

  • Parking prohibited from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
  • Signs will be placed by 9:00 p.m. that day

 

Q: What do I do if my car gets towed?

A: If you parked on a street that was signed to be cleaned PRIOR to a temporary “No Parking” sign being placed, contact 311 with your licence plate number for the location of where it was towed.

If you parked your vehicle on the street AFTER the placement of temporary "No Parking" signs, please contact 311 for the location of your vehicle.

Categories: Roads, Traffic, Waste Removal

FAQs on Power Smart LED Roadway Lighting Conversion Program

Manitoba Hydro has started their Power Smart LED Roadway Lighting Conversion Program. Over the next five to seven years the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) street lights will be replaced with light-emitting diode (LED) street lights. All street and back lane lights within the City of Winnipeg will be replaced over this period.

Q:        What group has the authority to make this change?

A:        Manitoba Hydro.

Q:        Why is Manitoba Hydro replacing all of the existing street lights?

A:        LED roadway lighting provides a number of benefits over current HPS lights, including reduced energy consumption, longer life, reduced maintenance requirements and better colour rendering.

Q:        Are LEDs brighter than the current street lights?

A:        LEDs produce a different spectrum of light than HPS lights. The human eye perceives this light to be brighter because it creates more contrast between light and dark areas. Additionally, the white light allows the human eye to see colour, enhancing the perception of brightness. 

Q:        What if I find the lights too bright?

A:        With any change, there is an adjustment period required to become accustomed to the new lights. However, some individuals may feel the light is still too bright after a period of time. LEDs are an extremely flexible technology and can be adjusted if necessary.

Q:        Are street lights managed by the City of Winnipeg or the Province of Manitoba?

A:        Street lights are under provincial jurisdiction and are managed by Manitoba Hydro.

Q:        If the lights are out on my street, where do I call?

A:        Please report it to Manitoba Hydro at 1-888-MBHYDRO or use the online form at http://bit.ly/1q6iek7. You can also call your provincial MLA. 

Q:        Will new lighting installs be LED?

A:        Yes, Manitoba Hydro will install LEDs in new developments or as part of the city’s street renewal program. Any project involving the replacement of the street light standard will also be converted to LED.

Q:        Do LEDs contain harmful substances like mercury?

A:        LEDs are mercury-free and all LED components are fully recyclable.

Q:        Will LEDs last in Manitoba’s weather?

A:        LED roadway lighting has been installed in a number of cities in North America, such as Los Angeles, Seattle, Mississauga and Edmonton. Manitoba Hydro has also been actively testing LED street lights in Churchill, Thompson and Winnipeg to ensure they work year-round. When installed correctly, LEDs are able to handle any weather with ease.

Q:        How many lights are being replaced?

A:        There are over 130,000 street lights province-wide scheduled for conversion over the five-to-seven-year period.

Q:        Will the light produced change what areas along the street are illuminated?

A:        Manitoba Hydro provides the installation, maintenance and operation of street lighting. It was written into the contract that some spillage be kept to light the sidewalk as well. LED street lights have a more pronounced cut-off than HPS street lights, resulting in less light spillage into private properties alongside the roadway. However, Manitoba Hydro has specified spill lighting to ensure that the entire right-of-way has some degree of lighting to enhance peripheral vision.

Q:        If I would like to request adjustments to the lighting, whom do I contact?

A:         Please contact Manitoba Hydro to assist you with the request. They can be contacted by phone at 1-888-MBHYDRO or you can complete the online form at http://bit.ly/1q6iek7.

 

Categories: Infrastructure, Public Safety, Roads

FAQ on Waverley Underpass Project

Q: What is the background on this project? 

A: Due to rapid growth in the southwest quadrant of the City and increasing traffic congestion due to heavy train operations, upgrading the Waverley crossing of the CNR Rivers rail line has become a priority in recent years. With approximately 30,000 vehicles and between 35 and 40 train movements passing through the intersection daily, the Waverley rail crossing has become a major bottleneck.

The project includes replacement of the existing at-grade railway crossing at Waverley and Taylor with an underpass along with reconstruction and rehabilitation of Waverley Street and increasing Taylor Avenue between Waverley Street and Lindsay Street to four lanes.

This project will not only improve traffic flow in the area but will also enhance safety, mobility and capacity as well as active transportation within the project area.

Q: What can I expect to see at the open house?

A: The City is holding an open house to give the community an update on the Waverley Underpass Project. At the open house you can view the detailed design for the underpass, learn about pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, intersection and road improvements, as well as construction timelines and detours. 

Q: When will this be built?

A:Detailed design will take place throughout 2016 and construction will begin around January 2017. Construction will be complete by December 2019 with some minor work such as landscaping continuing into 2020.

Q: Will I still be able to use Waverley and Taylor?

A: Both Waverley Street and Taylor Avenue will remain open to traffic during construction via a detour. During construction, eastbound traffic on Taylor Avenue will be required to turn southbound on Waverley Street. Eastbound Taylor Avenue traffic is encouraged to use Grant Avenue as an alternate route. Additionally, southbound traffic on Waverley will be required to turn westbound on Taylor Avenue to access the detour – eastbound (left) turns at Taylor Avenue will not be permitted during construction. A proposed detour map is available on the City’s website.

Q: How much is this going to cost?

A: Total project cost is approximately $155 million. This is a Class 3 estimate (accurate within +30% to -20% of the final construction cost). Estimated costs will be refined to a higher level of detail as part of the detailed design process.

Q: How will the project be paid for?

A: The project will be funded by the City of Winnipeg, the Province of Manitoba and the Government of Canada, as well as contributions by CN who has a financial obligation for a portion of the rail crossing under an existing agreement with the City of Winnipeg.

Q: Can the rail line be moved out of the city?

A: Relocating rail lines is a long term concept that would require consensus from a multitude of stakeholders. The City needs to move forward now to accommodate the rapid growth in the southwest quadrant of the City and to alleviate the increasing traffic congestion in this area due to heavy train operations. Building the underpass will not prevent discussions in regards to rail relocation.

Q: Will properties be required, either during construction or post-construction?

A: The vast majority of the project can be built on City owned land and right-of-way. However, construction easements or small parcels of land are needed for the construction of this project. In order to ensure we meet the project timelines, property has been expropriated. However we continue to negotiate with these affected land owners. We continue to work with immediate land owners to address specific issues related to development on their property.

Q: How will transit be affected?

A: Bus routes and bus stops will be relocated or rerouted during construction. Please see the City’s website for links for the proposed temporary and permanent locations of transit routes and stops before, during, and after construction. 

Q: How will active transportation facilities be affected?

A: Temporary active transportation pathway will be provided on the west side of the roadway detour to accommodate pedestrians and cyclists during construction. The final configuration of active transportation pathways is shown on the overall concept map available on the City’s webiste, and features pathways on both sides of Waverley Street, as well as a new pathway on the north side of Taylor Avenue.

Q: Was an overpass considered?

A: An overpass was considered early on in the design process. However, due to heights, clearance requirements, property impacts, and other engineering constraints, this option was deemed not feasible.

Q: What are the environmental impacts?

A: There are no environmental impacts of note that would result from this project. Soil sampling within the proposed underpass area indicates no issues of concern, and is consistent with Manitoba Conservation regulations. The project would also involve reconstruction of the existing rail bed and replacement of the rail tracks in the study area with seamless rail, which may decrease vibration and noise from rail activities. 

Q: Will traffic increase as a result of this project?

A: The results of the transportation study and traffic modeling indicate that traffic as a whole may increase due to overall growth in the southwest quadrant of the city. However, traffic is expected to flow much better due to the elimination of the congestion caused by trains, resulting in an improvement to traffic in the area overall.

Q: Will the project involve changes to street function and design in River Heights, such as the current one-way designation on Waverley north of Grant?

A: No changes are proposed for the existing street functions and patterns in River Heights.

Q: Is a Sterling Lyon connection to Taylor or Pembina still being considered?

A: No, this option was examined by the City of Winnipeg, and is no longer being considered. The Waverley location continues to be the preferred rail crossing location, and has been identified as a potential crossing location since at least the early 1970s. The right-of way and property required for the Waverley Underpass is largely assembled, and would have minimal property impacts. In addition, there is an existing agreement in place with CN Rail for a grade separated rail crossing at Waverley, which obligates the railway to pay for a portion of the crossing.

Q: Will the four-way stop at the intersection of Taylor Avenue and Borebank Street remain in effect after construction?

A: Yes, the existing four-way stop at the intersection of Taylor Avenue and Borebank Street will remain in effect once the twinning of Taylor Avenue between Lindsay Street and Waverley Street is complete.

Q: Will Lindsay Street be widened or modified as part of this project?

A: No, there are no plans to do any work on Lindsay Street as part of the Waverley Underpass project.

 

Categories: Development, Infrastructure, Roads, Traffic, Transit

Proposed Changes to Winnipeg Transit Routes 84, 86 and 94

Winnipeg Transit  is proposing changes to three routes, routes 84, 86, and 94.  These changes were approved at SPC-IRPW on April 13, 2017, and the service is anticipated to take effect in fall 2017.

Will this improve Lindenwoods service?

For the majority of transit users in Lindenwoods, service will be upgraded.  Currently in Lindenwoods on weekdays, the frequency of service on the 84 and 86 varies between 60-74 minutes between buses.  With the modified service, the frequency is anticipated to be improved to 45 minutes. 

What are the 94 Route changes?

Reintroduce two-way service on Route 94 which will benefit travellers headed to area schools, incorporate Whyte Ridge into area served by 94, and elimination of evening service into Wildwood.

What are the 84 and 86 route changes?

The 84 and 86 will no longer be “mirror images” of one another, they will be quite different now:

Whereas at present where the 84 and 86 only operate as far as Stafford terminal, (which has limited connectivity to other routes on Pembina Highway), the 84 and 86 routes will now terminate on the Southwest Transitway at Fort Rouge Station, making it possible to make transfers to rapid transit service routes north to the downtown or south to the U of M along Pembina.. 

Route 86 will no longer make use of Kenaston, returning to travel via Waverley.  It will also now serve the Bridgwater area.

Route 84 will use Kenaston and serve IKEA and the new Seasons outlet mall.  Service into the McGillivray/Kenaston shopping area will be simplified, continuing to be served by the 84 which will terminate here, whereas the 86 will pass through the area.

Neither the 84 or 86 routes will service Whyte Ridge, service to this area will instead be taken over by 94, which now will have 2-way service.

Will any stops be closed?

A small number of stops between Whidden Gate and Avon Gate will be closed; this will mean some users will have to adjust the stops they use.

Will stops be reinstated?

The changes reinstate service to the seniors housing immediately north of Sterling Lyon via Route  86.

 

Categories: Transit

Citizens on Patrol Program (COPP) - Neighbourhood Safety FAQ

Q:           Are there any citizen-led groups helping with neighbourhood safety?

A:            In addition to law enforcement groups, there is the Citizens on Patrol Program (COPP). This group consists of dedicated volunteers who work to address community safety-related issues.

 

Q:           What is the main goal of COPP groups?

A:            The primary goal of the COPP groups is to be additional “eyes and ears” in the neighbourhood, looking out for suspicious or criminal activity, record this activity and report to police if necessary. They work in the community together with the police to assist in reducing crime.

 

Q:           Can I become a member of a COPP group?

A:            Anyone interested in assisting with keeping the neighbourhood safe with an existing COPP group or by starting a new group can get in touch with the Provincial Coordinator of COPP by email at coordinatoratcopp@mpi.mb.ca or by phone at 204-985-8849. You may also apply online at http://www.citizensonpatrol.mb.ca/VolunteerAppForm.aspx.

 

 

Q:           How can COPP groups reduce crime in the neighbourhood?

A:            COPP groups have 3 major facets to their crime reduction program: Deterrence – providing a presence in the community through patrolling by vehicle, on foot, and by bicycle; Education – informing Manitobans about crime prevention; and Awareness – increasing Manitobans’ awareness on crime-related issues, for example auto theft and speeding.

 

Q:           Who started COPP?

A:            COPP was originally started in 1991 as a program guided by local law enforcement, with partnerships formed with communities to make those communities safer. In 2001, Manitoba Public Insurance partnered with Manitoba Justice to improve support and networking opportunities for the COPP groups.

 

Q:           Are there many COPP groups?

A:            There are currently 78 COPP groups registered with the Manitoba Citizens on Patrol Program.

 

Q:           How can I find out if there is a COPP group in my neighbourhood?

A:            More information on all registered COPP groups can be found at http://www.citizensonpatrol.mb.ca/Groups.aspx.

 

Q:           Can anyone become a COPP member?
A:           
To find out what is involved in becoming a COPP member and any requirements, please visit http://www.citizensonpatrol.mb.ca/WhatsInvolved.html. All tasks/responsibilities, qualifications, and training details can be found here.

 

More information on COPP groups can be found at www.citizenspatrol.mb.ca.

Categories: City Hall, Public Safety

2016 General Assessment FAQ

Please be advised that the 2016 General Assessment roll has been certified and the formal Notices are now being mailed.  Property owners should expect to start receiving their Notice within the next couple of days.  Please find below some general information with respect to the 2016 General Assessment. 

 

Q:           What is the Reference Date?  

A:          The 2016 General Assessment is based on a reference date of April 1, 2014.  This means that the values we have produced for the 2016 General Assessment are based on the value as if the property were sold on April 1, 2014.  The 2016 values update existing values which were based on an April 1, 2012 reference date. 

 

Q:           What was the average assessment increase?

A:           The average city-wide assessment increase for all properties is about 10%.

While this is the average increase, the real estate market will have affected each property differently, with some properties increasing in value above, at, or below the 10% city-wide average.

 

Q:           When will property taxes be based on these new assessment values?

A:           The 2016 General Assessment roll will not be used for taxation purposes until 2016.

 

Q:           How will this new assessment impact my property taxes?

A:           It is too soon to determine the impact on property taxes.  City Council, the various school divisions, and the Province of Manitoba (Education Support Levy) must first set their respective 2016 budgets and corresponding tax rates.

However, it is important to remember that an increase in the market value of a specific property does not necessarily result in a proportionate increase in the level of property taxes.

 

Q:           What if I disagree with this new assessment value?

A:           Property owners may file an appeal with the Board of Revision.  The deadline for filing an appeal is June 25, 2015.

 

Q:           Where can property owners obtain additional information?

A:           Additional information on the 2016 General Assessment can be found at our website:

http://www.winnipegassessment.com/AsmtTax/english/previewprogram/default.stm

 

Additional information on filing an appeal can be found at the Board of Revision website:

http://winnipeg.ca/clerks/TOC/boardofrevision.stm

 

              

If you require any further information, the 311 Contact Center and ask to make an appointment to talk with the assessment office. 

Categories: Taxes and Fees

Weed Control

Q:           What is the City working to control weeds?

A:            The City is currently working to combat weeds by mowing frequently to reduce the height and appearance of weeds.

 

Q:           What Legislation was passed last year that affects this?

A:            Last year The province passed a law banning (limiting ?) pesticide and herbicide use in MB.  ….. (write something here… send to JO for proof)

 

Q:           Is the City spraying to control broadleaf weeds, such as dandelions?

A:            The City currently does not have a spraying program for broadleaf weeds in lawns, per the Provincial legislation passed in 2014. This is in an effort to switch to the use of bio-pesticides and organic methods to control weeds on lawns.

 

Q:           Is the City looking into alternative sprays for broadleaf weeds, such as dandelions?

A:            Yes, the City is currently testing a product called Fiesta. Most alternatives provide only short-term control for smaller areas, such as yards, versus wide area usage. The testing with Fiesta will assess its level and duration of efficacy, on which the City can then base future decisions.

 

Q:           What is the City doing about weeds on hard surfaces?

A:            The City is currently using two products to combat weeds on hard surfaces: Ecoclear and Finalsan. Residents who see problem areas where weeds have grown in cracks on asphalt, concrete, etc are encouraged to phone or email 311 Services at 311 or 311@winnipeg.ca and report the location or address of the site.

 

Q:           Are there any eco-friendly herbicides the City is using?

A:            The City is currently using two alternative, eco-friendly products for hard surfaces: Ecoclear and Finalsan. The sprays are currently in the evaluation phase to assess efficacy so that going forward, we can present the best strategy to manage weeds.

 

Q:           Does the City address fields of tall grass?

A:            Yes, the City will attend to fields with grass heights of 6” or higher. If you see a field which needs attention, please call or email 311 Services at 311 or311@winnipeg.ca. Make sure to include the location or address of the field as accurately as possible.

 

Additional information on weed control and herbicides can be found at ***waiting to hear back from Rodney Penner if they have a dedicated site for this type of info (couldn’t find anything on Parks & Open Space city site)

 

Categories: Bugs, City Hall

How do I get a pot hole fixed?

Make your request by calling 311.

If the request is not dealt with satisfactorily or if you do want to call 311 please call Councillor Orlikow directly at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@winnipeg.ca.

Your call or email will be addressed within 24 hours, Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

Categories: Roads

How do I find out if a street or back lane is going to be redone?

 

Contact me at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca

There are many streets that are considered in such poor shape that they must be replaced.  Unfortunately, there are only a few residential streets and back lanes done per year.

Go to images/userfiles/2010RHFG_streets.pdf to see how your street is rated.

Go to  images/userfiles/2011 RHFG_alleys(1).pdf to see how your back lane is rated.

or give us a call and we will look into it for you. 

Please note that only those back lanes and streets that are rated poor are considered candidates for replacements.

Categories: Infrastructure, Roads

How do I request my back lane be fixed?

 There are many back lanes that have failed or are in the process of failing. Presently, there are one to three back lanes, depending on the length of the lanes, reconstructed each year.

How to make your request for a new back lane
1.      Check to make sure your back lane has failed by looking at the map. images/userfiles/2011 RHFG_alleys.pdf  or call 986-5236 
 
2.      Call 986-5236 if you disagree with the map or have questions on the condition of your back lane.
 
3.      If your back lane is listed as failed then make your request by calling 311. Your request will then be taken into consideration when lanes are chosen in July for the following year’s work.
 
4.     Neighbourhood petitions are acceptable and can be sent to Councillor Orlikow.

Categories: Infrastructure, Roads

How do I find out when my area is going to be sprayed for bugs and other bug information?

Information about Mosquito Control, Cankerworms, Dutch Elm Disease, wasps and other issues relating to bugs can be found at:

http://winnipeg.ca/cms/bugline/

Categories: Bugs

My garbage was missed, how do I get my garbage picked up?

Make your request by calling 311.

If the request is not dealt with satisfactorily or if you do want to call 311 please call Councillor Orlikow directly at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca.

Your call or email will be addressed within 24 hours, Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

For more information on waste collection please visit City of Winnipeg Web page at:

http://winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/garbage/default.stm

Categories: Waste Removal

What can I do about over grown grass and/or weeds?

If you see grass and/or weeds that are overgrown you can request that it be cut by calling 311.

 

The City is responsible for cutting and maintaining public spaces, parks and non-residential boulevards.

Home-owners are responsible for cutting and maintaining their lawns and boulevards.  

Your request to get grass and weeded areas cut and/or cleaned up will result in an inspector inspecting the property.

If it is a residential property, the inspector will be checking for compliance. Then, if required, will notify the homeowner that they have to remedy the situation or the City will address the issue for the home owner at the home owner’s expense. 

If the request is not dealt with satisfactorily or if you do want to call 311 please call Councillor Orlikow directly at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca.

Your call or email to Councillor Orlikow will be addressed within 24 hours, Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

 

Categories: By-laws, Green Space

What can I do about too much and too fast traffic using my street?

Contact me at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca.

I am tracking concerns as I realize that this is one of the biggest issues facing all of our neighbourhoods.

Supporting initiatives that promote traffic moving around our communities and traffic calming within our neighbourhoods continues to be a priority.

Categories: Traffic

Who do I contact if I see a dangerous playground?

Report the problem by calling 311.

If the request is not dealt with satisfactorily or if you do want to call 311 please call Councillor Orlikow directly at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca.

Your call or email will be addressed within 24 hours, Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

Categories: Green Space

How do I request traffic signals for an intersection?

Make your request by calling 311.

If the request is not dealt with satisfactorily or if you do want to call 311 please call Councillor Orlikow directly at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca.

Your call or email will be addressed within 24 hours, Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

Categories: Roads, Traffic

What does a person do if they expect that the sewer pipe is broken?

You own the sewer pipe from your building to the City's sewer main. This includes the part under your property and the part under City property.

A guide on what you need to do if you expect a break or back up is caused by failed water and/or sewage line is listed on the City of Winnipeg's web page at:

http://winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/sewage/pipeResponsibilities.stm

If the request is not dealt with satisfactorily or if you do want to call 311 please call Councillor Orlikow directly at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca.

Your call or email will be addressed within 24 hours, Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

Categories: Waste Removal

Where do I get information on Council and Committee meetings?

Agendas and minutes for all Council and Committee meetings can be found at www.winnipeg.ca/CLKDMIS/.

If you have any questions please contact Councillor Orlikow at jorlikow@orlikow.ca or by calling me at 986-5236.

Categories: City Hall

How do I know who my City Councillor is?

Click onto Neighbourhoods and a ward map is available for all those living in the River Heights/Ft. Garry Ward and in which neighbourhood.

Go to:

http://winnipeg.ca/interhom/maps/ElectoralWardsMap.stm to find all City of Winnipeg wards and the respective City Councillor.

Categories: City Hall

What day is my recycling picked up?

Please go to:

http://winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/recycle/ to find a calendar.

Categories: Waste Removal

Is there a community guide to assist me in working with my community?

To help you, I have developed a Community Connection Guide that provides you or your group step by step assistance taking on a community project.

There are also supporting seminars provided free of charge to assist community groups.

This Community Connection Guide is available free to all by emailing me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca or call me at 204-986-5236. 

Categories: City Hall, Community Centres

How do I set up a neighbourhood committee?

To help you, I have developed a Community Connection Guide that provides you or your group step by step assistance taking on a community project.

There are also supporting seminars provided free of charge to assist community groups.

This Community Connection Guide is available free to all by emailing me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca or call me at 204-986-5236. 

Categories: City Hall, Community Centres

How do I get the snow cleared and get other information regarding snow clearing?

Make your request by calling 311.

If the request is not dealt with satisfactorily or if you do want to call 311 please call Councillor Orlikow directly at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@winnipeg.ca.

Your call or email will be addressed within 24 hours, Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

http://winnipeg.ca/publicworks/snowremoval/

To find information on:

  • Parking Bans Information
  • Subscribe to Parking Ban Email Notifications
  • Snow Clearing Policy
  • Snow Disposal Sites
  • Winter FAQ's

Categories: Roads

Why is there no public skating on retention ponds?

A resident inquired as to having an ice trail on retention ponds.

Due to the uncertain ice conditions and the lack of resources the City is unwilling to insure or provide resources operating budget.

It is a wonderful idea and a great way to connect a neighbourhood.  I will continue to see if there are opportunities in the future.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Sustainability

What is a secondary plan?

A secondary plan is a general overview of the type of appropriate development for an area.
 
They provide a community voice, provide a guideline for developers and decrease the adversarial nature of the present system.
 
The secondary plan process involves community input and creates a guideline of the type of possible future development, if any, that is acceptable and can be expected for an area.
 
An outline of a secondary process is available at:

Categories: Development

What are the issues associated with the Water and Waste Utility

Some of the key concerns are:

 - cost/saving for the taxpayer questionable.
- conflict of interest guidelines for private partner.
- significant private ownership/involvement in decision making in a core public service.
- poor quality business plan presented to Council.
- lack of legislation protecting the taxpayer.

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

How can I be involved in decisions that are made at City Hall?

You can become a community advisor.  This involves providing me with information on what your community needs are and providing feedback to decisions that I must make at City Hall.

You would select certain issues that you want to be notified when a vote is taken on the issue.

Your feedback would then be taken as information and used when deciding how to vote.

I believe that the best solutions are the ones that best take into account the needs of all stakeholders.

For more information on becoming a community advisor please contact me at 986-5236 or email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca.

Categories: City Hall

Reducing the Speed Limit on residential streets

There have been a number of request to reduce residential speed limits to 40 km/hr. to address safety issues associated with traffic going too fast down residential streets in our neighbourhood.

The response from the City's administration does not support doing so and requires Provincial approval which is not also supported.
 
The administration’s response to Councillor Orlikow's request was:
 
" It should be stressed that simply changing a speed limit sign to some arbitrary speed limit has proven, both here and in other jurisdictions, to have little, if any, impact on actual vehicle operating speeds.  On this basis, speed limit reductions are not considered “traffic calming”. 
 
 
 
I would also note that in the past, the Province has indicated no support for reducing speed limits in Winnipeg to less than 50 km/h."
 
Further information on this issue can be found at:
 

Categories: Traffic

Consultant's answers to residents on the proposed Bike Boulevards

 The answers below are the consultants's responses to the questions and comments made by residents.

Please let me know if you have comments, suggestions or concerns. 

1.  Question:      Concern about removal of parking around the church on Grosvenor at Lanark
 
Answer:         The parking lane along the north side of Grosvenor is under-utilized the majority of the time.  In order to provide for a safe bicycle corridor this space is required; it is recommended that parking be shifted to Beaverbrook and Lanark.   Alternatives for this current proposal are as follows:
 
a)     End bike corridor at Lanark and revert to a shared roadway for cyclist traffic.
 
b)     Look at constructing bump-ins to accommodate Church patrons and park users.  However, this would be a drastic measure as mature trees would have to be removed and property would have to be acquired.  As well, with the construction of bump-ins for parking, the sidewalk would have to be reconstructed further north.

2.  Question:      Where does the bike path goes once it dead ends at Lockwood? 

 Answer:         The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard ends at Lockwood after crossing the former CN rail right-of-way by a 3.5 metre multi-use pathway. Via Lockwood, cyclists can cross Kenaston at the traffic signals at either Tuxedo or Lockston. Tuxedo currently has a cyclist activated button to give cyclists a priority green light ahead of the traffic on Tuxedo on the west of Kenaston. As part of the Route 90 widening project a bike path has been proposed for two-way cyclist travel on the west boulevard of Kenaston. The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard via Tuxedo and Lockston would connect to this future bike path. In addition Tuxedo to the west of Kenaston is currently on the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation (AT) Network map as a future AT route that would connect to Grosvenor.
 
3.  Comment:     For Fleet, Warsaw, Nassau to be a good route, say from CMU, it needs to have a foot path across the Rail Road track.  It has slow RR traffic.
 
Answer:         Unfortunately a footpath crossing of the CPR rail lines between Renfrew and Lindsay, while a good idea was not possible for many reasons. These reasons include budget, property issues and project timelines. We have recognized that that the east-west connections across the rail lines are important and have proposed multi-use pathways along the rail right-of-way on Lindsay St to Corydon Ave and on Corydon Ave across the tracks to Renfrew. By using these pathways cyclists and pedestrians will be able to connect from Fleet to John Brebeuf Pl.
 
4.  Question:      Some streets in R. Heights could have parking on the opposite side, i.e. some on East, some on West.  This allows bikers to choose streets where they are not likely to run into an opening car door.
 
Answer:         Due to the funding arrangement and timing deadlines we are not able to conduct a wider parking study on all streets within River Heights. We will pass your comment onto Kevin Nixon, the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation Coordinator for future consideration.  
 
5.  Question:      Cycling N & S. in our area could be facilitated along the former RR track if narrow cross walks were built on the boulevards of Grant and Corydon.  We like to go this route to Wellington and Assiniboine Park and is now even more feasible with nice black top along the new condos.
 
Answer:         Unfortunately due to property ownership issues these routes cannot be pursued at this time.
 
6.  Comment:     My only concern is that the area to the south-east of Pembina is cut off from this route. I don't know if there are plans to put in a pedestrian bridge or tunnel to go across.
 
Answer:         The city is currently looking at solutions to the Pembina underpass issue. While it is not a part of this project, it is something that the city will be looking at in the future.
 
7.  Comment:     Going through our neighbourhood, I much prefer Dorchester to Grosvenor; Lilac to Stafford or Harrow. Removal of some of the east-west stop signs would make Dorchester much more useable.
 
Answer:         As there are limited amounts of funding and the corridors have already been chosen, removal of stop signs and required mitigation through traffic calming along Dorchester is not within the scope of works for the current project.
 
8.  Comment:     Grosvenor Avenue between Stafford and Wellington can be quite congested. Traffic lines up for the light; there is continuous parking; the street is not that wide. We always avoid Grosvenor, taking the alley or Dorchester. I cannot see adding bicycle lanes without eliminating parking, which would be a nuisance as the neighbourhood is quite densely populated.
 
Answer:         Currently there are no bicycle lanes proposed on Grosvenor between Stafford and Wellington for the reasons that you mentioned and we agree that removing parking on that particular stretch is not a feasible option. 
 
9.  Suggestion: I would very much like to see standard signage alerting motorists that bicycles will be crossing or entering a major street. 

Answer:         This is something that we can consider as part of our signage strategy for the project. 

 

 
10.  Comment:    We need to make sure that there are no gaps. One of these is the connection between the Maryland bridges and Wellington Crescent. Riders coming from downtown and heading south on Wellington will cross on the Sherbrook side, to save time and to eliminate three difficult road crossings. The bridge sidewalk is wide enough for cyclists to pass pedestrians, but there is no safe connection to Wellington. Cyclists should be prevented from turning onto the sidewalk in front of the synagogue, and instead, the street crossing should be made safer.
 
Answer:         Unfortunately Wellington Crescent is not one of the funded routes that is part of the Infrastructure Stimulus Program and is not a part of this particular project. We will pass your comment onto Kevin Nixon, the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation Coordinator for future consideration.
 
11.  Question:     Because Fleet is a snow route, how does the bike boulevard change our designation?
 
Answer:         No change would occur to Fleet's designation as a snow route.
 
12.  Question:     Snow plowing is hard enough without any bump outs
 
Answer:         The City of Winnipeg Public Works Maintenance is kept fully aware of all proposed changes on all active transportation routes and the design of new roadway features takes into consideration snow clearing operations.
 
13.  Question:     Permanent "bike route signage" similar to the green signs on Balmoral and Wellington
 
Answer:         The final design of the bike route signage has not been determined yet.
 
14.  Comment:    I think a number of suggestions you listed on your card may all help in calming traffic, with the exception of traffic circles. I have lived in a number of cities in Canada and have actually seen some of them removed over the years. I wonder if there is something to be learned in that before the city goes ahead and potentially wastes some time and money on that specific measure.
 
Answer:         Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%.  They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops.  When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%.  They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years.  Their purpose along bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic.
 
15.  Question:     Are curb bump outs on Cambridge appropriate?
 
Answer:          There are limited amounts of funding and the corridors have already been chosen, traffic calming measures implemented along Cambridge is not within the scope of works for the current project. Cambridge is identified on the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation Network as a future route, so curb bump outs or other traffic calming measures may be considered in the future as part of a new project.
 
 
16.  Question:     Is the intersection of Waverly and Grosvenor appropriate for a traffic circle?
 
Answer:          The effect of installing a traffic circle at the intersection of Waverley and Grosvenor would have on Cambridge then I can safely say that it is anticipated that there will not be an impact.  Traffic Calming Circles are primarily used to calm traffic rather than divert it elsewhere.  In other words, traffic should remain on Waverley and Grosvenor.  As an Active Transportation route it is anticipated that Grosvenor will become calmer and thus more successfully accommodate cyclists.
 
17.  Question:     Where was the consultation with the community?
 
Answer:         The information gathered at the January Working Session on the Fort Rouge / River Heights Bikeway system was used to develop the information presented at the February 24 Open House. The presentation materials from February 24 are on the City of Winnipeg website. 
 
18.  Question:     Will traffic calming be achieved by adding traffic circles?
 
Answer:         Based upon Canadian engineering publications and sound engineering judgment we feel that the traffic calming circles are appropriate along this corridor.
 
a.      Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%.  They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops.  When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%.  They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years.  Their purpose along this bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic.  The traffic calming circles will be signed and marked appropriately so they are not dangerous to the travelling public. [I would like to know where and why the traffic calming circles are inappropriately placed.
 
b.      As far as lane widths go, this is up to the discretion of the City of Winnipeg.[I would like the gentlemen to specify exactly where the lane widths or parking lane widths are less than desirable. ]
 
19.  Question:     Will there be an opportunity to attend an open house to discuss in more detail?
 
Answer:         The Nassau Street information session will be held on Thursday April 8, 2010 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM at Crescent Fort Rouge United Church, 525 Wardlaw Avenue.
 
20.  Question:     Why is the process so rushed?
 
Answer:         The process is very rushed as we are reacting to the Federal Government’s time lines associated with the funding for this particular project.  However the City of Winnipeg Council approved the active transportation program and have allocated resources to AT initiatives each year for the past 4 years in order to build its AT network.
 
21. Question:              A resident inquired about the safety of adding of a traffic circle at Brock & Grosvenor, being the entry point to the park, is very busy with people with dogs, babies and small children.
 
 
Answer:       Based upon Canadian engineering publications and sound engineering judgment we feel that the traffic calming circles are appropriate along this corridor.
 
Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic. Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%. They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops.
 
When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%. They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years.
 
Their purpose along this bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic. The traffic calming circles will be signed and marked appropriately so they are not dangerous to the public.
 
Currently there is not a four-way stop at the intersection in question.
 
There is a two-way stop for traffic on Brock Street while Grosvenor is free-flow. The addition of a traffic calming circle on Grosvenor will decrease vehicle speeds on Grosvenor, which should increase pedestrian safety.
 

22.    Question:    What signs will replace the removal of stop signs where traffic circles are going?

Answer:     There will be yield signs at the traffic circles as the control device.

The traffic circles will also have plantings on them that will enhance the area.

 

Categories: Alternative transportation

Does a person driving a car or bike go around the traffic circle if they were turning left?

To make a left turn at a traffic circle, you will travel around the centre island in a counter - clockwise direction.

The traffic circles will be signed with Chevron Alignment signs which will direct traffic to travel counter-clockwise around the centre island.

 

Categories: Alternative transportation

Putting a multi-use path along the Renfrew Backlane

 In regards to putting a multi-use path along the Renfrew Backlane the consultant replied to the constituents question is:

-          There is not enough space (only about 3.5m between the tracks and the parking lot for Quizno’s/Mac’s Convenience Store) for a Multi-use path to go through from Corydon to John Brebeuf.  This wouldn’t provide any clear zone (required for safety) between the parking fence and the track bed.

-      Not enough lighting along the backlane to provide a safe location for multi-use path.

-      Many trees along the rail right of way (would have to be removed)

Categories: Alternative transportation

What is a traffic circle and how do they work?

Winnipeg will benefit from the installation of its first neighbourhood traffic circles as part of the on-road infrastructure being introduced under the Active Transportation Infrastructure Stimulus Program (ATISP).

Traffic circles have become an essential aspect of design and engineering for active neighbourhoods in North America.

They have been used to great success in manycities including Edmonton, Minneapolis, Vancouver and Montreal and are increasingly being implemented in smaller urbancentres and suburban areas.

For more information please click on the link below:

images/userfiles/Traffic Circles Outline.pdf

Categories: Alternative transportation, Roads, Traffic

How do I request a sidewalk for my street?

 

The local improvement process provides a method for property owners to share the cost of constructing improvements when the owners of at least 60% of benefiting properties support the improvement. The Local Improvement process is not applicable to the renewal of existing structures (sidewalks, street and lane pavements, sewers, watermain, etc.)

http://winnipeg.ca/publicworks/services/LocalImprovements.asp

Categories: Roads

Will the Fleet Bike Boulevard extend to Brebouf?

On the original AT-ISP map John Brebeuf was not on the route, but we decided for connectivity we would propose to add a path to get across the tracks and simply place signage on John Brebeuf as a bike route.

 Therefore, the are no traffic calming measures, removal of parking or addressing the four way stops along this section at this time.
 

Categories: Alternative transportation, Roads

Answers to Councillor Orlikow's Bike Boulevard Questions

Grosvenor – West Leg

Q:        How does the Boulevard connect to Kenaston and has Kenaston pedestrian over-pass been accounted for?
 
A:        The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard ends at Lockwood after crossing the former CN rail right-of-way by a 3.5 metre multi-use pathway. Via Lockwood, cyclists can cross Kenaston at the traffic signals at either Tuxedo or Lockston.
 
Tuxedo currently has a cyclist activated button to give cyclists a priority green light ahead of the traffic on Tuxedo on the west of Kenaston.
 
As part of the Route 90 widening project a bike path has been proposed for two-way cyclist travel on the west boulevard of Kenaston.
 
The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard via Tuxedo and Lockston would connect to this future bike path. In addition Tuxedo to the west of Kenaston is currently on the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation (AT) Network map as a future AT route that would connect to Grosvenor.
 
The pedestrian overpass proposed as part of the Route 90 widening project at Lockston then Grosvenor would link to this via Lockwood.
 
 
Q:        Has the parking for Westworth United church been addressed?
 
A:                    The parking lane along the north side of Grosvenor is under-utilized the majority of the time.  In order to provide for a safe bicycle corridor this space is required; it is recommended that parking be shifted to Beaverbrook and Lanark.   Alternatives for this current proposal is as follows:
 
·        End bike corridor at Lanark and revert to a shared roadway for cyclist traffic.
 
·        Look at constructing bump-ins to accommodate Church patrons and park users.  However, this would be a drastic measure as mature trees would have to be removed and property would have to be acquired.  As well, with the construction of bump-ins for parking, the sidewalk would have to be reconstructed further north.
 
Q:        Is it wise to remove four way stops?
 
A:                    Yes, The addition of a traffic calming circle on Grosvenor will decrease vehicle speeds on Grosvenor, which should increase pedestrian safety.
 
Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%.  They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops.  When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%.  They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years.  Their purpose along bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic.
 
Q:        Is there a concern about removing the four way stop at the Waverley and Grosvenor intersection due to high volume of traffic.
 
A:        No, The traffic count for this intersection does not exceed 1000 vehicles per hour therefore the intersection is within the limit for a fully functional traffic calming circle.
 
Q:        Is the street measurements accurate for the West Grosvenor?
 
A:        Yes the street width has been confirmed by survey and is wide enough for 2 bike lanes and 2 travel lanes (with parking removed).
 
Grosvenor – East Leg
 
Q:        Is road wide enough? (Cambridge to Stafford).
 
A:        The roadway is approximately 11 meters, a “road” diet is implemented which will enhance the traffic calming of the street with narrow lanes for both the cyclist as well as the vehicles. A parking lane will be provided in this section.
 
Q:        What options are available for a one lane bike boulevard from Lilac to Stafford? (The citizen proposal was:   link the Boulevard to Wellington down Dorchester St. from Wellington to Lilac then down Lilac to Grosvenor. Then remove parking on one side down to Stafford where it connects to the west leg)
 
A:        A one lane bike boulevard from Lilac to Stafford is not an option since parking is required on both sides of the street at Stafford and Grosvenor (for the businesses). There is a proposal to have permanent parking on Grosvenor (on both sides of Grosvenor from Stafford to Wellington) with curb extensions to calm traffic as well as have a wider travel lane for the vehicles and cyclists to share, this is still under investigation.           
 
 
Fleet – West Leg
 
Q:        Where does it connect to and can the $50 K from Active Transportation go to connect straight across and/or up old rail line to Juba park?
 
A:        As part of this project the Fleet / Warsaw Bike Boulevard will end at Centennial. The City of Winnipeg Active Transportation Network map shows a future connection from here to Route 90 that the City would like to pursue in the future. Route 90 is also proposed to have a future bike path alongside it as part of the widening project. Unfortunately this connection cannot occur as part of this project due to budget restrictions, project timelines and property issues.
 
Q:        Can a pedestrian bridge be build over the CPR tracks?
 
A:        No, the construction of a bridge over the CPR would not be feasible as there is not enough property at the end of John Brebeuf to accommodate the structures’ descent to street level (to be accessible for cyclists and pedestrians with disabilities). 
 
Q:        How will snow plows deal with raised crosswalks?
 
A:        The City of Winnipeg Public Works Maintenance is kept fully aware of all proposed changes on all active transportation routes. Every effort is made to ensure that any proposed changes to roadways such as traffic calming on bike boulevards would not impact snow clearing. The raised crosswalk would be very similar to speed humps that currently exist on several roads in the city.
 
Fleet – East Leg
 
Q:        There is a lot of traffic going through the Nathaniel and Fleet intersection. Is there any plans to deal with this intersection?
 
A:        Nathaniel and Fleet is a T-intersection with large trees in the boulevard, no treatment is proposed. The stop sign is for Nathaniel which allows the cyclists and pedestrians to get through the intersection safely on Fleet.
 
Q:        Is there parking allowed on Fleet and Warsaw?
 
A:        There is no plan to remove any parking on Fleet or Warsaw at this time.
 
Q:        How are cars and bikes going to be separated from each other and to allow for bikers to safely turn onto Thurso?
 
A:        The intersection of Fleet and Thurso is currently a four-way stop and this will not change. Bike and motor vehicle movements will remain the same with all users of the intersection taking their appropriate turn to travel straight through or to make a turn.
 
Q:        Is there going to be any help for people getting across Harrow?
 
A:        With the cross walk at Jessie and Harrow for the school as well as not enough boulevard width and mature trees, this crossing will not be aided.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Roads, Traffic

How do I find out if I will be paying more property taxes to the City?

You can go to The City of Winnipeg's assessment website

www.winnipegassessment.com  

You can enter into "self service" at the top menu bar and then hit "property search".

Once in you can type in your address.

After entering in the appropriate information you can see your 2009 value (based on 2003 reference year), and the 2010 value (based on April 1, 2008).

This info can also be mapped, and they can see the 2009 and 2010 values of other properties by hitting the "Value Map" box in this area.

This information will allow you to selectively determine by area how much property values have increased.

If the value has increased more then 70% it is likely you will be paying more property taxes even through the City of Winnipeg did not increase the mill rate.

 

 

Categories: City Hall

Safety Resources provided by Winnipeg Police Service

The Winnipeg Police Service has a web site that is one way that the Police Service uses to communicate with the public.

The web site has a lot of useful information such as recent break and enters and car thefts in your neighbourhood,Licence plates of possible stolen vehicles and valualble crime prevention information and tips.

Please visit the web page at www.winnipeg.ca/police

Categories: Public Safety

Will the City cut the boulevard in front of my home if I am unable to?

The City of Winnipeg will cut the boulevard for those people that are unable to due to medical reasons.

There is an application and interview required to be eligible.

To apply for this service please contact 311 to have an application sent to you.

Categories: By-laws, Green Space

Why not use Kingsway instead of Grosvenor Ave.?

While Kingsway is also a good route, it does not have a facilitated crossing at Harrow and is discontinuous at Harrow.

Its connection as an AT route to Wellington Crescent is also made difficult due to its proximity to Academy and queuing traffic at the lights there. 

As well, part of the future plan for Grosvenor is to extend it westward to Lockwood across the old rail right-of-way by constructing a multi-use pathway.

Categories: Alternative transportation

How do I find out if I am in a buffer zone?

The only way to determine if a property is affected by a buffer zone is by calling 311.

There is no online capability for doing so.

Categories: Bugs

How do I report disturbance related to Air Planes

The Richardson International Airport, The City of Winnipeg and the Province of Manitoba have various by-laws and processes to ensure that noise from planes landing and taking off is addressed.

If you are concerned about the amount of the noise caused by planes in your neighbourhood then please call the Winnipeg Airport Authority at 987-9403.

Categories: By-laws

Why use Grosvenor Ave as a Bike Boulevard?

The City of Winnipeg is developing an active transportation bike boulevard on Grosvenor which entails implementing traffic calming measures and bike lanes to slow down vehicles and create a safer environment for pedestrians and cyclists.

The width of the roadway is not being reduced, however with the addition of curb extensions at certain intersections the driver will perceive that the road is narrower.  The effect will be a speed reduction for vehicles and a shorter distance for pedestrians to cross the road.
 
On-street parking will be removed from the north side of a section of Grosvenor (west of Cambridge) as it is underutilized the majority of the time; the street is wide enough east of Cambridge to accommodate lanes for parking, vehicles and cyclists.
 
The addition of a traffic calming circles on Grosvenor will also decrease vehicle speeds on Grosvenor, which should increase pedestrian safety.  Traffic counts for this street indicate it is within the limit for fully functional traffic calming circles. Traffic calming circles, used at the proper frequency, can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%.
 
Grosvenor is an important east-west connection for cyclists due to its continuity and the controlled crossings at major intersections.  Adding bike lanes and traffic calming measures on to Grosvenor creates a safer cycling environment while still allowing full vehicle access to the street.

Categories: Alternative transportation

Why was I not aware of the Bike Boulevards?

It is unfortunate that the attempts made to engage the community prior to construction, including Canada Post mail out to all Ward residents north of the CNR tracks, hand delivered letters to houses four in from the Bike Boulevards, numerous community paper ads, emails and three open houses was not successful in engaging the community.

I was shocked that no notification was also provided to the neighbourhood warning them about the upcoming construction. That was not acceptable and I twas able to at least get a commitment to put up signage along the routes providing some basic information and contact information.

Please help me communicate with you by signing up (www.orlikow.ca) for Community Connections bulletins that will be sent to you when issues or news occurs in your neighbourhood.

Categories: Alternative transportation

Why Place Curb Extensions on Fleet?

Curb extensions (or a widening of the boulevard), which narrow travel lanes, are a traffic calming technique used in residential areas.

Curb extensions improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists by:

-Reducing vehicle speeds

-Providing improved sight lines for cyclists by defining parking bays and preventing cars from parking too close to an intersection

-Reducing crossing distance for pedestrians

-Increasing pedestrian visibility

Curb extensions were designed on Fleet to be the same width as a parked car to allow for the above. 

Cyclists ride approximately 1 meter off of parked cars / the parking lane, thus no weaving is required in the presence of a curb extension.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Traffic

What is the purpose of curb bump outs?

The purpose of curb bump outs is two-fold:

1) They create a shorter distance for pedestrians to cross, making people standing at an intersection more visible

2) They slow down vehicular traffic. The general principal is that the wider and more open a street, the faster the cars will travel down it.

The space between the bump-outs are wide enough for both the bicycle lanes and traffic lanes.
 
So although the lanes are wide enough to accomodate both bicyclists and traffic, they give the perception of narrower lanes, which should slow down traffic.
 
Additional information bump outs can be found at:
 
 
 

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Public Safety, Traffic

How are traffic circles safer for pedestrian crossing?

August, 2010 -  For instance lots of students walk across Waverley on their way to River Heights School.

Could you tell us how the traffic calming circles will improve safety for pedestrians?


At all intersections with traffic calming circles vehicles must yield to pedestrians crossing the road as laid out in the Manitoba Highway Traffic Act.

Traffic calming circles are designed to slow vehicle movements through intersections.    A vehicle can “roll” through an intersection controlled by a stop sign, however, a traffic calming circle creates a physical obstacle in the roadway to attract motorists’ attention and slow them down.  The combination of slower moving vehicles and more attentive drivers creates a safer pedestrian environment.

On Grosvenor the type of traffic calming circles constructed will not cause vehicles to encroach upon pedestrian movements. 
As well, by design the traffic calming circle will reduce pedestrian-vehicle conflict points.  Prior to the implementation of these circles the intersection of Waverley and Grosvenor had 24 pedestrian-vehicle conflict points, whereas it now has been reduced to 8 pedestrian-vehicle conflict points.
 
Sidebar re: Crash Reduction
There are two basic premises on which roundabouts achieve crash reductions of 50 to 90 percent when compared to two and four-way stop control and signalized intersections and greatly reduced severity on those few crashes that do occur.
One is the simple decision making combined with the low level of conflicts.
At a four-way intersection there are 32 possible conflict points between vehicles and only eight at roundabouts.
Pedestrians face six conflicts when crossing only one leg of the road whereas at a roundabout they only have two. (See figures attached to email.  Traffic Circle 1 shows a regular intersection.  Traffic Circle 2 shows an intersection with a traffic circle.)

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Public Safety, Traffic, Transit

What is C4?

1. C4 is a collaboration of 3 centres (Sir John Franklin, River Heights and Crescentwood Community Centres)
2. No centres will be shut down. C4 will serve one community out of 3 campus sites.
3. Each site has strengths and assets that are part of a comprehensive model for recreation, leisure, & wellness.
4. C4's goal is to provide a representative programming portfolio. C4 recognizes community needs go beyond an organized sport model. Centralized programming will help expand & coordinate program offerings, eliminate duplication, and centralize registration and calendars.  In short - provide better service and more options through coordinated boards, staffing and volunteers. At the same time, C4 is committed to provide quality sport programs and venues.
5. C4 is in a process. C4 is gathering feedback regarding board and management amalgamation. They are excited to move forward and are looking for community support.
6. Facility concepts have been explored - so far as to confirm no shut-downs are required. Adaptive reuse is possible through innovation. Continued consultation and design development is required - again, C4 is in a process.
7. Facility projects are in a conceptual stage. Several million dollars per facility will be required - fundraising will be a collaboration of the three centres as the Central Corydon Community Campus (C4).
8. The Nov. 30 meeting will explain the process of program, management, and board amalgamation. Facility concepts will be shared.
 

Categories: Community Centres

Community Connection Bulletin

What are they?
They are monthly updates on what is happening in your specific neighbourhood.
 
Why do I want one?
So you have the information you need to provide suggestions, express concerns or to enable you to make decisions.
 
What type of information can I expect?
You can receive information about what is happening in your specific neighbourhood and/or other neighbourhoods. 
 
How do I sign up?
Email me at jorlikow@orlikow.ca and indicate that you want to sign up.

Categories: City Hall

Answers to Questions from Councillor John Orlikow

Q- Concern about removal of parking around the church on Grosvenor at Lanark

A - The parking lane along the north side of Grosvenor is under-utilized the majority of the time.  In order to provide for a safe bicycle corridor this space is required; it is recommended that parking be shifted to Beaverbrook and Lanark.   Alternatives for this current proposal are as follows:

a)     End bike corridor at Lanark and revert to a shared roadway for cyclist traffic was not approved by administration.
 
b)     Look at constructing bump-ins to accommodate Church patrons and park users.  However, this would be a drastic measure as mature trees would have to be removed and property would have to be acquired.  As well, with the construction of bump-ins for parking, the sidewalk would have to be reconstructed further north which was not approved by adminstration or the Councillor.
 

Q - Where the bike path goes once it dead ends at Lockwood

A - The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard ends at Lockwood after crossing the former CN rail right-of-way by a 3.5 metre multi-use pathway. Via Lockwood, cyclists can cross Kenaston at the traffic signals at either Tuxedo or Lockston. Tuxedo currently has a cyclist activated button to give cyclists a priority green light ahead of the traffic on Tuxedo on the west of Kenaston. As part of the Route 90 widening project a bike path has been proposed for two-way cyclist travel on the west boulevard of Kenaston. The Grosvenor Bike Boulevard via Tuxedo and Lockston would connect to this future bike path. In addition Tuxedo to the west of Kenaston is currently on the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation (AT) Network map as a future AT route that would connect to Grosvenor.

 
Q - For Fleet, Warsaw, Nassau to be a good
route, say from CMU, it needs to have a foot
path across the Rail Road track.  It has slow
RR traffic.
 
A - Unfortunately a footpath crossing of the
CPR rail lines between Renfrew and
Lindsay, while a good idea was not possible
for many reasons. These reasons include
budget, property issues and project
timelines. We have recognized that that the
east-west connections across the rail lines
are important and have proposed multi-use
pathways along the rail right-of-way on
Lindsay St to Corydon Ave and on Corydon
Ave across the tracks to Renfrew. By using
these pathways cyclists and pedestrians will
be able to connect from Fleet to John
Brebeuf Pl.
 
Q - Some streets in R. Heights could have
parking on the opposite side, i.e. some on E,
some on W.  This allows bikers to choose
streets where they are not likely to run into an
opening car door.
 
A - Due to the funding arrangement and
timing deadlines we are not able to conduct
a wider parking study on all streets within
River Heights.
 
Q - Cycling N & S. in our area could be
facilitated along the former RR track if narrow
cross walks were built on the boulevards of
Grant and Corydon.  We like to go this route
to Wellington and Assiniboine Park and is
now even more feasible with nice black top
along the new condos.
 
A-  Unfortunately due to property ownership
issues these routes cannot be pursued at
this time.
 
Q - My only concern is that the area to the
south-east of Pembina is cut off from this
route. I don't know if there are plans to put in
a pedestrian bridge or tunnel to go across.
 
A- The city is currently looking at solutions to
the Pembina underpass issue. While it is not
a part of this project, it is something that the
city will be looking at in the future.
 
Q - Going through our neighbourhood, I
much prefer Dorchester to Grosvenor; Lilac
to Stafford or Harrow. Removal of some of
the east-west stop signs would make
Dorchester much more useable
 
A -  As there are limited amounts of funding
and the corridors have already been chosen,
removal of stop signs and required
mitigation through traffic calming along
Dorchester is not within the scope of works
for the current project.
 
Q - Grosvenor Avenue between Stafford and
Wellington can be quite congested. Traffic
lines up for the light; there is continuous
parking; the street is not that wide. We
always avoid Grosvenor, taking the alley or
Dorchester. I cannot see adding bicycle
lanes without eliminating parking, which
would be a nuisance as the neighbourhood
is quite densely populated.
 
Currently there are no bicycle lanes
proposed on Grosvenor between Stafford
and Wellington for the reasons that you
mentioned and we agree that removing
parking on that particular stretch is not a
feasible option. 
 
Q-  I would very much like to see standard
signage alerting motorists that bicycles will
be crossing or entering a major street
 
A - This is something that we can consider
as part of our signage strategy for the
project. 
 
Q - We need to make sure that there are no
gaps. One of these is the connection
between the Maryland bridges and
Wellington Crescent. Riders coming from
downtown and heading south on Wellington
will cross on the Sherbrook side, to save
time and to eliminate three difficult road
crossings. The bridge sidewalk is wide
enough for cyclists to pass pedestrians, but
there is no safe connection to Wellington.
Cyclists should be prevented from turning
onto the sidewalk in front of the synagogue,
and instead, the street crossing should be
made safer.
 
A-  Unfortunately Wellington Crescent is not
one of the funded routes that is part of the
Infrastructure Stimulus Program and is not a
part of this particular project. We will pass
your comment onto Kevin Nixon, the City of
Winnipeg Active Transportation Coordinator
for future consideration.
 
Q - Because Fleet is a snow route, how does
the bike boulevard change our designation.
 
A- No change would occur to Fleet's
designation as a snow route.
 
Q -  Snow plowing is hard enough without
any bump outs or traffic circles
 
A -The City of Winnipeg Public Works
maintenance is kept fully aware of all
proposed changes on all active
transportation routes and the design of new
roadway features takes into consideration
snow clearing operations.
 
Q -  I think a number of suggestions you listed
on your card may all help in calming traffic,
with the exception of traffic circles. I have
lived in a number of cities in Canada and
have actually seen some of them removed
over the years. I wonder if there is something
to be learned in that before the city goes
ahead and potentially wastes some time and
money on that specific measure.
 
A- Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm
traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can
actually reduce the overall speed of the
roadway by 10%.  They can be used at
intersections that do not have existing stop
signs or at intersections with two-way or four-
way stops.  When implemented they reduce
conflict points and decrease collision rates
by up to 70%.  They have been used
successfully in the United Kingdom since the
mid 1970s and have caught on quite
dramatically in North America in the last ten
to fifteen years.  Their purpose along bike
corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity
and to also to calm and potentially reduce
traffic.
 

Categories: Alternative transportation

Why Traffic Circles?

Based upon Canadian engineering publications and sound engineering judgment we feel that the traffic calming circles are appropriate along this corridor. 

Traffic Calming Circles are known to calm traffic.  Used at the proper frequency they can actually reduce the overall speed of the roadway by 10%. 
 
 
 
 
They can be used at intersections that do not have existing stop signs or at intersections with two-way or four-way stops. 
 
 
 
When implemented they reduce conflict points and decrease collision rates by up to 70%.  They have been used successfully in the United Kingdom since the mid 1970s and have caught on quite dramatically in North America in the last ten to fifteen years. 
 
Their purpose along this bike corridor is to provide cyclist route continuity and to also to calm and potentially reduce traffic.  The traffic calming circles will be signed and marked appropriately so they are not dangerous to the travelling public

Categories: Alternative transportation

Preliminary Flood Outlook

The Province of Manitoba released its preliminary flood outlook on January 24, 2011. This early flood outlook suggests that in some areas of the city, property owners could experience a spring flood similar to that of 1997.

Based on this preliminary outlook, you may be required to build a dike to protect your property.

We ask that you:

1. Authorize someone to act on your behalf to oversee your property if you are planning to be away between March 1, 2011 and May 1, 2011. Please contact our 311 Centre and provide the contact information for this individual.

 

2. To assist us in communicating with you over the coming weeks, please contact our 311 Centre by February 25, 2011, and provide your contact information (i.e., phone numbers, email address).

 

We anticipate the Province of Manitoba will issue its next flood forecast toward the end of February. We will update you as more detailed flood information becomes available.

If you have any questions, please contact our 311 Centre, open 24 hours every day, by phone at 311 or by email at 311@winnipeg.ca

 

Question and Answers – Spring 2001

 

Will we experience levels as high as 1997?

  On January 24, 2011, the Province of Manitoba released its first 2011 flood outlook for Winnipeg; the upper-decile condition (i.e., 10% chance) is predicted to be 25.0 ft (James), which is slightly higher than the 1997 level of 24.5 ft (James). With higher flows predicted on the Assiniboine River, levels in the north area of Winnipeg are expected to be close to those of 1997; however, levels in the south end of the city could be up to 2 ft lower than they were in 1997.

 

If I need to build a dike around my house, how can I get help?

   “At risk” property owners have a responsibility to build a dike around their homes;

           however, the City of Winnipeg will provide:

o Surveying and staking (dike alignment) on property

o The required number of filled sandbags and plastic sheeting

o Dike building instruction

o Technical support

 

Will the City be organizing volunteers?

  It may become necessary to support property owners with volunteer support and coordination. If the flood event requires a large number of volunteers, the City will organize volunteers with the assistance of 311.

 

Will affected property owners have to evacuate?

  The City will only recommend evacuation where there is a threat to safety.

  Advanced notice will be provided to affected homeowners if evacuation is anticipated.

 

I noticed surveyors collecting information in my neighborhood; should I be concerned?

  There is no cause for concern; the City is continuously updating its flood database with additional information collected from field surveys.

 

Should I be clearing the snow from the designated dike area?

  There is no need to clear snow for a dike at this time. If you have obstructions that are easily removed, they should be removed now.

 

Where can I get more information?

  Additional flood related information can be found on the City’s website at:

 

www.winnipeg.ca/emergweb

 

The Public Works Department will continue to communicate directly with affected property owners as more detailed flood information becomes available. To assist homeowners with technical questions, the Public Works Department will set up a technical call centre prior to the operational start of the flood event. It is anticipated the call centre will go live on March 7, 2011. In addition, the Dike Operation Centre (DOC) will provide initial and ongoing written correspondence with affected property owners including the contact information for the technical call centre.

 

Categories: City Hall

City Administration Responses to Traffic Circle Suggestions

On December 12, 2010, Councillor Orlikow met with residents concerned about the safety associated with traffic circles.  There were a number of suggestions recommended and the following is a reply from the City of Winnipeg’s Transportation Department's response to those recommendations.

Q - Add speed humps to slow traffic as cars enter the intersection but only ¾ the length of the road to allow for cyclist to travel at either side.
 
A - As per the City’s criteria for installation of speed humps (approved by the Standing Policy Committee on Public Works on January 13, 2003 and approved by City council on January 29, 2003), speed humps are not permitted to be constructed on a transit route, snow route or a residential collector streets. Grosvenor Avenue is a transit route, snow route and a residential collector street, thus does not qualify for speed humps. 
 
Additional information:
 
-          Speed humps are most effective when spaced at 100-125 metre intervals along a route to effectively reduce vehicular speeds along a route. It is not the City’s practice to construct one speed hump to reduce vehicular speed at a certain point.  
 
-          Providing an open area to allow cyclists to travel beside the speed hump as suggested may encourage motorists to swerve such that one wheel can bypass the speed hump to reduce the impact of the vertical deflection.   This commonly occurs in parking lots.  This creates safety concerns for motorists, especially when traveling at or near the speed limit, as well as for cyclists which may be traveling within the adjacent open area. 
                                                                                             
Q - Add Pedestrian-crossing corridors and signage to assure that pedestrians have the right of way.
 
A - All of the City’s traffic circles are signed as according to the “Canadian Guide to Neighbourhood Traffic Calming” developed by the Transportation Association of Canada and Institute of Transportation Engineers.  The manual includes installation of a “yield” sign when entering the traffic circle on each approach.  The “yield” sign indicates to motorists that they must yield (and stop when necessary) the right-of-way to those that are in front of them (i.e., other motorists, pedestrians wishing to cross the street and cyclists), before entering the traffic circle, and must not proceed until it is safe to do so. 
 
Additional information:
 
            A yield sign requires that drivers must yield the right-of-way to all motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians that arrive first to the intersection.  As well, the City would not add a pedestrian crossing sign to a yield sign as it is not a proper traffic engineering practice to have two forms of traffic control devices at the same location.  It should also be noted that there is a hazard marker below the yield sign on the approach to the traffic calming circle, which would be obstructed by a crosswalk sign.  For the reasons stated above, the City is unable to recommend installation of pedestrian crossing signs at traffic calming circles. 
 
Please note that the City is currently working with Manitoba Public Insurance to enhance their education campaign to remind the public about what they are expected to know as drivers/cyclists/pedestrians when approaching and traveling within a traffic calming circle.  Please also note that MPI already published earlier this month ads in the Free Press information about traffic calming circles and other driving concepts required when driving through a traffic calming circle.  Below are links to both MPI and the City’s website containing this information:
 
 
 
Q - Remove bump-outs due to the danger associated with merging of bikes and cars.
 
The bump-outs are designed to reduce vehicular speeds of motorists when entering the traffic calming circle.  The bump-outs also help reduce the distance a pedestrian needs to walk on the street (hence reducing the collision potential) and increases the visibility of pedestrians.  Removing the bump-outs may increase vehicular speeds which may decrease safety of both cyclists and pedestrians.  
                                                                                                                                                                                          
Additional Information:
 
A continuous bike lane, that was suggested, through the intersection goes against proper traffic engineering practices as it would force drivers to drive over the bike lane in order to negotiate the traffic circle 
 
Please note that under the Manitoba Highway Traffic Act, motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians have a responsibility to conduct themselves appropriately when approaching each other.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Traffic

Sump Pump Questions and Answers

What is the sump pump subsidy program?

 

The City of Winnipeg and Province of Manitoba have introduced a subsidy program to help homeowners protect their basement from flooding. Subsidies are available one time for the installation for either in-line backwater valves, sump pit drainage systems, or both. They must be installed since May 1, 2010. The subsidy covers 60% of invoiced costs, including eligible labour, materials, permit(s), and taxes up to $1000 for in-line backwater valves, and up to $2000 for sump pit drainage systems. More details are available at:

  
 

http://www.winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/drainageFlooding/basementFloodingProtectionSubsidyProgram.stm

 

A Frequently Asked Questions page is available at:

 

http://www.winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/drainageFlooding/basementFloodingProtectionSubsidyProgramFAQ.stm

 

How do I apply?

 

After the appropriate permit(s) and inspection are obtained, you can fill out and send in the application form, along with the original invoice and copy of the permit(s) to:

 

Basement Flooding Protection Subsidy Program
City of Winnipeg, Water and Waste Department
110 - 1199 Pacific Avenue
Winnipeg, MB   R3E 3S8
Monday to Friday (except holidays) from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

 

Applications are reviewed on a first come-first serve-basis. Please review the webpage for the application form, more details on eligibility criteria, and conditions for labour costs:

 

http://www.winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/drainageFlooding/basementFloodingProtectionSubsidyProgram.stm

 

How long is the wait time?

 

The City of Winnipeg will review your application within two weeks of the date it is received and send you a letter along with your original receipt. If approved you will received a cheque by mail within 30 days. If denied you will receive an explanation in the letter.  

 

How do I get a permit?

 

Either a homeowner or a plumber licensed by the City of Winnipeg can apply for a permit. After installation, you can't close it up until the inspector comes out and inspects it. You can contact an inspector at 986-5300 and arrange a time for inspection.

 

You can contact the permits office at 986-5140. For a permit application you can go to the weblink below:

 

http://www.winnipeg.ca/ppd/permits_plumbing_reqmnts.stm

 

If a sump pump or backwater valve has been previously installed and inspected before the subsidy program, will a second inspection be required?

 

No. The inspection is on record with their permit on file.

 

Will there be enough subsidies for everybody who applies?

 

There are too many factors to get any reliable prediction. Anywhere from 330 to 1000 subsidies will be given on a first-come first-serve basis, depending on the eligible costs.

 

Why do we need a professional plumber? What defines a professional plumber?

 

Homeowners can do the installation themselves so long as they receive the permit. Installation will be subject to inspection. The city won't pay for the homeowner’s labour. Only the retail costs will be eligible if it's done at home. If a licensed plumber does it then the full bill, including labour can be reimbursed after the bill is paid. Property, Planning & Development (PP&D) licenses the plumbers.

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

Black Knot Fungus

What is Black Knot Fungus?

Black Knot is fungal disease affecting many species of cherries, plums and other members of the genus Prunus. The disease is distributed across North America and is widespread throughout the City of Winnipeg in susceptible plants growing on private properties, boulevards, parks and naturalized areas.

Is Black Knot prevalent in the River Heights/Ft. Garry Ward?

Black Knot disease is prevalent in the Linden Woods neighbourhood with the population of Shubert chokecherries that were planted when the neighbourhood was developed.

Can Black Knot be removed from a tree?

Once a tree has Black Knot Fungus it is extremely difficult to remove. It can be pruned out of a tree but it will continue to re-grow in time. Essentially once a tree has Black Knot it will always have Black Knot.

Will new trees planted by the City of Winnipeg also be at risk for contracting Black Knot?

The Urban Forestry Branch has not planted Shubert chokecherries for many years. We have also excluded Shubert chokecherry from the list of acceptable tree species for planting in new developments.

Will trees with Black Knot be replaced?

The City of Winnipeg pruned all of the park and boulevard trees in the Linden Woods area in 2008, removing whatever Black Knot was possible. Over time the worst-hit trees will be replaced with different species, but we do not have a program in place to cull out all of our Shubert chokecherries and replace them.

For more information on Black Knot Fungus see this link : http://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/Forestry/PAMPHLETS/BlackKnot%20Info%202009.pdf

Follow Councillor John Orlikow on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/#!/johnorlikow and join the conversation on Facebook @ http://tinyurl.com/orlikowfacebook

Councillor Orlikow's contact information, www.orlikow.ca, jorlikow@orlikow.ca, 204-986-5236



Categories: Green Space

What steps can I take to Reduce Opportunities for Arson?

The Winnipeg Fire Department provides an excellent outline, check list and action plan on what you can do to protect your home from arson.

For more information go to: images/userfiles/Homeowners Checklist.doc

Categories: Public Safety

Waverley St. Residents Want People to Slow Down

A traffic meeting with residents regarding Waverley between Fleet and Grant Ave was requested by a resident and on June 29 I met with about 20 residents regarding traffic concerns associated with Waverley St. between Fleet and Grant Ave.

There were many suggestions provided by the neighbours and I am committed to working with them in resolving the issue.
 
Q:        What type of street is Waverly between Fleet and Grant?
 
A:        Waverly between Fleet and Grant is a Local Residential Street.
 
Q:        Visibility Issue associated with Grant Bus Bench Positioning.
 
A:        It was mentioned that the bus bench at the corner of Waverly and Grant was at an acute angle and was blocking site lines for people wishing to turn. The bench has been turned, however is not flush with the road. If this continues to be a problem blocking sight lines for traffic please do let my office know and we will see if it can be rotated more.
 
Q:        Can Speed Humps be used?
 
There was the request for speed humps, a prior attempt had failed due to street not meeting criteria.
 
A:        Our office has been in contact with Cindy Desjardin a Traffic Engineer for the City of Winnipeg. Cindy arranged for the study to be redone. The speed study was conducted in front of 634 Waverley Street (June 21-24, 2011) which is located in the middle third of the street, where speed would be highest, before they start to slow down for the line up for the light. The dates in June fell within peek traffic times similar to those found in the fall when the community had asked for it to happen. The June dates had the added benefit of getting an answer quickly.
 
As approved by the Standing Policy Committee on Public Works on January 13, 2003 and adopted by City Council on January 29, 2003, the warrant criteria for installation of speed humps are as follows:
 
  1. The street is a local residential street and is not a Transit route, snow route or a residential collector street; and
  2. Submission of a petition indicating support for speed humps from at least 70% of the residents in the block; and
  3. At least one of the following speed criteria is met:
(i)                 An average speed exceeding the speed limit (50 km/h); or
(ii)               At least 15% of vehicles exceed the speed limit by 5 km/h or more (55 km/h); or
(iii)             At least 10% of vehicles exceed the speed limit by 10 km/h or more (60 km/h).
 
Table 1 shows the summary of the study results compared to the speed warrant for installing speed humps.
 

TABLE 1:  SPEED HUMP WARRANT CRITERIA ANALYSIS
Speed Criteria
Warrant Level
Study Results
Warrant Met?
(i) Average Speed
> 50 km/h
44 km/h
No
(ii) Percent of traffic exceeding speed limit by 5 km/h or more
15% or more
7.5%
No
(iii) Percent of traffic exceeding speed limit by 10 km/h or more
10% or more
2.0%
No

It should also be noted that the 85th percentile speed of vehicles was found to be 52 km/h.  The 85th percentile speed is a common transportation engineering indicator which refers to the speed at which 85% of vehicles are traveling at or below.  
 
As indicated in the table, the speed criteria does not meet the approved warrant criteria, therefore the City is unable to proceed with installation of speed humps on Waverley Street between Fleet Avenue and Grant Avenue at this time. 
 
For more information on speed humps @
 
Q:        What Can the Community do to get People to Slow Down?
 
A:        In response to a request for what the community can do we are providing information to the Manitoba Speed Watch program run through MPI, Adam Cheadle at 204.985.8998 or acheadle@mpi.mb.ca, One of the aspects of this program that after the speed board has been up for a time, MPI does an analysis of the data and shares it with the resident that organised the speed board.
 
 
Q:        Request for Lane signage “No Right Turn from Parking lot, Residents only”.
 
A:        There was information provided that a number of cars are using the back lanes to access North and it was suggested that “No Right” sign be put up on the exit onto the back lanes from the commercial parking lots.
 
Our office has made the request to the City administration and is awaiting response.
 
 
Q:        Can Speed humps be put into the Back Lanes?
 
A:        There was a request for adding Speed Humps to the back lane. 
 
Speed Humps can be placed in alleys. The threshold to be met is much lower for alleys than it is for front streets, as the speed limit for alleys is 30 kilometres/hr and our office is in the process of measuring the traffic. 
 
The neighbourhood will have to agree to the idea and apply for the speed humps. This is been considered by the neighbourhood for the fall.
 
Information regarding the warrant criteria for installing speed humps in public lanes @ How can I get Speed Humps for my Back Lane?
 
.Q:       Can 30KM Speed signs be put int the back lane?
 
A:        The hwy traffic act states that the speed limit for back lanes is 30 KM unless otherwise posted. Therefore, to post something is to imply that it is the exception not the rule. For this reason the City of Winnipeg administration denies all requests of this nature.
 
Q:        Barriers along parking lot edge of alley?
 
A:        One suggestion that was brought up is the possibility of putting barriers along the edge of the alley located between Waverley and Montrose St. and the parking lot at the strip mall. This would prevent the patrons of the mall using the alley to cut through the alley to return to the heart of the area, hopefully directing them to Grant where they would use a front street.
 
A:        Inquiries have been made with the Planning Department here at the City of Winnipeg to see if there is any impediment/ or merit to this idea. The reply is as follows
 
There is nothing in the site's zoning history (conditions on variances, zoning agreements, etc.) that the City can use as a mechanism to require the property owner to erect a barrier on their property. However, there is also nothing in the Zoning By-law prohibiting them from doing this as well. Given that this barrier would likely be erected on private property, it would require the consent of the property owner.”
 
This would mean that it may be possible to approach the property owners with the suggestion which I will do.
 
The Work Continues
 
We will continue to update the information and add any new Q&A when additional questions and/or suggestions are raised by the community.

Categories: Public Safety, Traffic

Kenaston Boulevard Widening.

 Q. What are the traffic counts for the St. James Bridge 10 years ago, presently and predicted?

A. The average week day vehicle count for the St. James Bridges northbound and southbound is approximately 73,000 vehicles per day.

This number has remained relatively constant over the last 10 years. The Preliminary Design Report estimates a yearly compounded growth rate of 1% for the next 20 years based on the demand created by all of the development in the south, i.e.; Ikea, Waverley West, South Pointe, etc.

Q. What is the proposed access of north bound traffic from Academy?

A. Traffic travelling westbound on Academy Road, headed northbound, will be brought to the signalized Kenaston Boulevard intersection which will have dual right turn lanes. The west leg of Academy will be closed which will increase the capacity of the remaining T-intersection to accommodate the dual right turn. Bringing this movement to Kenaston will increase the available weaving distance for northbound traffic to change lanes into the eastbound off ramp to Portage Avenue, as well as reduce weaving conflicts. The existing westbound to northbound ramp will be closed.

Q.  Does the project require a Federal or other environmental audit before it can begin?

A. If the project as a whole will include Federal funding it will likely require an environmental screening report which will be reviewed and approved by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency. Approval from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans as well as a City of Winnipeg Waterways permit will be required for bridge work which is typical for all river bridge work in the City.

Q. How will people entering and leaving the condominiums on the East side Kenaston Blvd. from Grant Ave to Taylor Ave?

A. The City is working on incorporating an access road off Taylor St.  that will provide access and exit for residents.  The access road does not link onto Grant Ave from Taylor and is for use by local residents.

For information about the project go to - http://www.orlikow.ca/news/view/?nid=137

 

Categories: Infrastructure, Roads, Traffic, Transit

Dog Licensing

Why is the city licensing dogs now?

Dog licensing has been mandatory in Winnipeg for over a hundred years. Beginning Sept 1st, 2011 the city will be strictly enforcing it by modeling the dog licensing program on that of the City of Calgary, which has a 90% compliance rate. Winnipeg has a 40% compliance rate. With fewer dogs licensed, fewer dogs are returned home to their owners. After Sept 1st, unlicensed dogs will be subject to a fine of $250.

Where do I license my dog?

 

How much does licensing cost?

It will cost $27 for spayed or neutered dogs and $62 for others.

How often does the license need to be renewed?

The license needs to be renewed every year. You can buy a two year license, which includes a ten per cent discount for the second year.

Where does the money I pay you for my dog license go?

100% of dog license fees stay with the Animal Services Agency to help offset the Agency costs. Your license fee allows Animal Services Agency to:

 

  • Feed and shelter your dog if it becomes lost until it can be re-united with you
  • Transport lost dogs that require emergency care to a veterinarian
  • Educate the public about responsible pet ownership
  • Help neighbours resolve their problems related to dogs
  • Return lost dogs to their owners
  • Reduces funding from taxes for the above and other animal related services designed to protect the public’s health and safety
  • Operate a Dog Adoption Program

 

In 2010 alone the shelter received just nearly 1700 dogs. While in care, all dogs are well fed and receive water, shelter, bedding space.

What are the benefits to buying a dog license?

A lost dog wearing its license tag is almost always re-united with its owner when found.

§         If we find your dog and it is wearing the license tag, the first ride home is free.

§         The dog license tells strangers that your lost dog is not homeless and is only one phone call away from going home.

§         You will not face legal action for failing to license your dog under the City of Winnipeg Pound By-law, thereby avoiding the time spent attending Provincial Court and the financial burden of paying the fine assessed by the magistrate.

Will I receive a reminder when it’s time to renew my dog license?

Yes.  Animal Services Agency will send an invoice to you in the month prior to your license expiring.

Why are cats not licensed?

The city is currently looking into cat licensing.

Where can I find more information on dog licensing?

More information is available on the Animal Services web page and FAQ:

Dog Licensing web page: http://winnipeg.ca/cms/animal/licenses/default.stm

Dog Licensing FAQ: http://winnipeg.ca/cms/animal/faqs/licensing_faq.stm#4

You can also contact Animal Services directly with any questions at 986-2155.

Categories: By-laws, City Hall

How do I find out who owns a house?

Q:      How do I find out who owns a house?

A:      The City has public access terminals available at the following two city offices:

Assessment and Taxation Department,
510 Main Street, Winnipeg,
OR 
Assessment and Taxation Counter,
457 Main Street , Winnipeg
 

Both locations are open between 8:30 and 4:30 pm - Monday to Friday.  These terminals provide duplicate copies of the original assessment notices and tax bills for viewing purposes which will include the information as to who owns the property in question. 

Categories: City Hall

Why do I need to get a dog license?

Dog licensing is very common in most major cities and municipalities in Canada.  A dog license protects your dog and helps provide the essential service of animal control. This includes transporting, housing, and caring for stray dogs and attempting to reunite them, to attending house fires or car accidents and helping removed dogs, to providing an adoption program to get unclaimed dogs adopted instead of euthanized.  

The code on a dog license tag provides a wealth of information to us regarding pet info, owner info with multiple phone numbers, and veterinary info. Dogs wearing licenses are almost always quickly reunited with their owners by Animal Services and 311. 

Dogs impounded wearing a dog license are given a “free ride home” once a year where all impound and boarding fees are waived. 

Our Animal Service Officers receive over 10,500 calls a year dealing with everything from stray dogs chasing children on school grounds, to barking dog complaints, to cases involving dogs which accidently got loose and need to be picked up.

Categories: By-laws, City Hall

Getting Academy Road Fixed

When was the last major maintenance done on Academy Road? 

The City has completed concrete repairs and overlays on different sections of Academy each year for around the last 5 years.
 
What does a "failed" road mean exactly? 
 
A failed road means it requires Rehabilitation or a Reconstruction due to the condition of the joints or slabs.
 
What is the current plan for the maintenance and/ or renewal of Academy Road?
 
The current plan is to add Academy from Elm to Harrow to a list of potential projects to be circulated to other departments for comments/recommendations for future works.  If Academy is ranked high on the list of candidates it will be considered for a future Capital Program.  If it does not then it is deferred to a future date.  
 
What can be done to reduce the noise from vehicles, mainly trucks and buses, as they hit the cracks on Academy Road?
 
Street Maintenance will continue to provide patching on Academy until it reaches the Capital Program. I will continue to support and lobby for an interim asphalt overlay if reconstruction is not approved in the short term.
 
What can be done to limit the number of large trucks using Academy Road to reduce the shaking of home foundations even as far away as the fourth house from Academy Road? In every single e-mail we received, residents reported concern and distress over the increase in noise, banging and rattling caused by large vehicles on this road.  Some have reported pictures falling and china rattling in cabinets.  Others, who have lived in the area for several decades, feel that an increase in foundation cracking is connected to the increases in vibrations and rattling from the road.
 
The request to have Academy Rd delisted as a truck route was not supported by Public Works however I am open to exploring if there are other options including in-ground barriers. 
 
There is an issue with that Academy Rd. is an important route to ensure that truck traffic does not use residential streets to cut through River Heights.
 
What can be done to enforce the speed limit of 50km/hr on Academy - many vehicles travel faster than 60km/hr.  This is especially problematic around Guelph and Academy where the road curves and residents of this area have seen a number of trucks and semitrailers overturn at that corner when they were taking it too fast.  For pedestrians, this blind corner is very dangerous to cross at as well.  
 
The Community Police Officers and the Traffic Division will be providing additional radar enforcement activities on the street and a traffic study to determine actual speeds is in process.
 
What is your plan to address these and other related issues with the city committees and administrators?  Many residents simply asked; when will the reconstruction begin?
 
I have and will continue to make the appropriate committees and administration aware of the need and the priority of getting Academy fixed. I wish I knew but can not say when the project will begin.
 
What is the estimated cost of a full reconstruction of Academy between Oak and Oxford?
 
The estimated cost to reconstruct Academy from Elm to Oxford is $1.8Million
 
What was the cost of the full reconstruction of Waverley Street (road only, not sidewalks) between Academy and Wellington Crescent?
 
The budget for Waverley between Academy and Wellington is $470,000.  This work was done under the Local Street Renewal Program
 
In determining whether specific road work must be earmarked in the capital budget or whether it is funded out of a general ongoing maintenance budget, is there a dollar limit criterion, and, if so, how much?
 
Operating money is used small patching and the Rehabs, Mill and Fills, and Reconstructions are allocated through Capital Budget. The money for this project would come out of the Capital Budget which Council approves every year.                                                                    
 
Can we expedite a solution to our immediate problem of the failed roadbed by fully reconstructing only the segment from Oak to Oxford now?
 
It may be an option and one that will be considered.
 
When is the next key date when decisions on prioritization of the road capital budget occur?  How can we influence this process?
 
The Department has conferred with me this summer regarding what I believe the priorities are, the Department then assesses all the projects in the Ward and City based on available budget. These recommendations would then go to various City of Winnipeg Standing Committees for review and input and other consultative processes begin in the fall. Council would then vote on the Capital Budget. 
It is suggested that all those affected call 311 to report the vibrations as this is a part of consideration when selecting candidates.
 
The City sent a resident that listed criteria for prioritizing road capital projects.  Nowhere in this list was the costs imposed by failed road conditions on the residents of the area.  The residents of houses in a band on either side of Academy along the failed segments endure multiple shocks and house tremors on a daily basis, and the annoyance cause by this failed road is a real private economic costs to residents.  Are these costs considered by the City’s engineers in the road Capital prioritization process?
 
The answer is that a person can always make a claim against the City however I was told that there would be no way to accurately and objectively quantify the costs.  
 
Is the traffic camera at Oak turned off at night?
 
As long as a camera is in the housing then it is turned on for speeding 24 hours a day. (Confirmed with Police services)  
   

For more information regarding traffic cameras go to. http://www.winnipeg.ca/police/safestreets/faqs.stm

Categories: Infrastructure

Vision for Academy Road

On October 5, 2011, after two years of consultation with area residents, a draft vision for Academy Road (a Plan Development Over-lay (P.D.O), will be before the City of Winnipeg’s City Centre Committee for a formal public hearing and a vote.

Below are some of the questions and replies asked throughout the process.
Q:        Parking lots behind Academy businesses where there is no east-west back lane are usually adjacent to a residential property. This resident requested that the PDO require landscaping where a parking lot abuts against a residential property in order to provide a pleasant transition and a sound barrier.
A:        Section 172(5), Development Standards for Parking Areas – Landscaping, of the City of Winnipeg Zoning By-law 200/2006 deals with the landscaping requirements for parking areas. Sections 188-193 set out the general landscaping requirements for the city as well as specific requirements for Side and Rear Site Edge Buffering and Buffering of Residential Uses from Non-Residential Impacts [Section 190(7)]. The buffering of residential uses adjacent to parking lots is a requirement of the Zoning By-law but does not apply retroactively to parking lots in existence at the time of adoption of the by-law. The requirements would apply to any new parking lots being developed adjacent to existing residential development. Therefore, this issue is adequately addressed through the existing by-law provisions.
Q:        What is the basis of recommended Mobile signs be removed?
 A:       Signs on private property are regulated by the City’s Zoning By-law 200/2006.
Note:  A PDO is a tool available under the City’s Zoning By-law that provides “… a means to alter or specify allowed uses and/or development standards in otherwise appropriate zones, in unique or special circumstances, in order to achieve local planning objectives in specially designated areas.  A PDO-1 zoning district is appropriate when additional zoning controls are required to address an area-wide (rather than site specific) condition, or to implement an area-wide plan for the proposed district” 
[Section 57(1)].  Section 4.10 of the proposed PDO modifies the section of the City’s Zoning By-law dealing with signs and is an appropriate use of a PDO-1. 
 The following adopted PDOs prohibit mobile signs:
·        Boulevard Provencher Planned Development Overlay (200/2006)
·        St. Norbert Neighbourhood Main Street Planned Development Overlay 1 (Amending By-law 80/2010)
·        Downtown Transcona Planned Development Overlay 1 (Amending By-law 118/2010)
 Each of these PDOs applies to a neighbourhood main street shopping area.
 The results from the public open house surveys and voting support the banning of mobile signs.  Most respondents at the first open house indicated that mobile signs and advertising signs (billboards, etc.) were their least preferred types of signage.  At the second open house, the majority of participants chose PDO options that included the banning of mobile signs.  Those who made additional comments repeatedly indicated that they would support banning mobile signs.
 The PDO provisions were based on the responses and input gathered through the public process that included both residents and businesses.  This information, in our view, supports including provisions in the PDO that prohibit mobile signs within the PDO area.
 When the Winnipeg Zoning By-law Review was underway, there was a targeted review of mobile signs on a city-wide basis. The Zoning Advisory Committee (ZAC) at the time worked with the Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce to come to a compromise position on the proposed regulations for mobile signs through a Mobile Sign Working Group. The eventual conclusion was one that everyone could live with, but it was recognized more work would need to be done in future years.
The sign standards were revised to improve the character of the city’s commercial corridors and business areas, as called for in Plan Winnipeg, and in ways common to other large cities. The changes to the sign regulations were an attempt to balance business needs, community aesthetics and safety while, at the same time, promoting economic development and tourism. ”Mobile Signs” were limited to eight feet in height, maximum of two signs per lot, maximum time limit of 90 days three times each year (total of 270 days), together with a spacing requirement of 65 feet between signs on adjacent lots.
The intent of mobile sign provisions in the Zoning By-law is to provide a signage option for special events. The mobile sign regulations in the new Zoning By-law were designed to provide an opportunity for portable, temporary signage to advertise or provide notification of grand opening sales or other special promotional events. The intent was not to have mobile signs become a permanent form of signage. The consulting team on the Winnipeg Zoning By-law Review identified that Winnipeg’s control of mobile signs was one of the areas where the former Zoning By-law was furthest away from the mainstream of land use regulation compared to other cities.
Concerns were expressed about the cumulative impact of mobile signs on various streetscapes, their perceived impact on the overall image of the city and the impact on traffic safety through driver distraction. Mobile signs are viewed as an economical and reliable form of signage for many small businesses, and some larger businesses. The recommendation of the Working Group at that time was that the existing mobile sign provisions in the former Zoning By-law could be maintained if a program was employed to ensure that the regulations were enforced. The former regulations allowed mobile signs to be displayed for three 90-day periods in one year.
The new program included a 6-point strategy designed to put some accountability on the industry to operate within the rules, and some onus on the City to secure additional revenues or free up existing resources to more actively enforce the City’s by-laws. The Working Group’s recommendation, which was also endorsed by the ZAC, was to maintain the current duration (maximum three 90-day display periods) plus modest new limitations (height limit, reduce number of signs per zoning lot from 3 to 2, 65’ spacing requirement adjusted), and implement a 6-point enforcement strategy.
Zoning By-law amendments should be consistent with the City's development plan. While Plan Winnipeg is still in force, the City has recently completed a major overhaul of its Plan under the OurWinnipeg process. OurWinnipeg together with four Direction Strategies, will guide the future development of the city over the next 20 years following approval by Council. The concepts being put forward under that process speak to the desire to have complete communities and complete streets. Neighbourhood corridors like Academy Road should be oriented to the pedestrian and exhibit urban design features that make them safe, accessible and attractive for pedestrians and cyclists. 
Q:        Did the Community Support Mobile Signs?
A:        No
Q:        Was there any type of commercial signage that was supported by participants of the visioning sessions?
A:        This category of signs was called “Business Identification signs” and was the most preferred type of signage. Respondents supported signage being pedestrian scale to conform to the character of the street, restrict third party signage and limit portable signs in the Central area. The general sense from the consultation was that pylon or free standing signs should not be allowed and that building mounted or canopies were the preferred sign type.
Q:        Are there any comparable restrictions to signage within the City of Winnipeg?
A:        For comparison purposes, we note that in the Boulevard Provencher PDO, all signage must be attached to buildings. In the Living Area provisions of the recently adopted Downtown Transcona PDO, free standing signs greater than 6 feet are not permitted. The Downtown Transcona Design Guidelines which are a supplement to the PDO request that all development shall incorporate signage that is designed primarily for pedestrians rather than vehicular traffic and be mounted on buildings as fascia, canopy, awning or projecting signs or located as window signs or monument signs.
Q:        Are changes in variances from the past grandfathered? For instance, is a sign variance grandfathered?
A:        Variances previously approved continue to be in force after the adoption of a PDO. A variance is attached to and stays with the land.
Q:        According to the Zoning Bylaw it seems that a 2500 square foot restaurant requires one parking spot for each 100 square feet (Parking Category 22, p115). This would be 25 spots. Is this a requirement or a guideline/suggestion?
A:        It is a requirement. Table 5.9 of the City of Winnipeg Zoning By-law identifies the required parking for various categories of development. These parking requirements, like all requirements of the zoning by-law, can be varied. Variance Orders are described in section 36 of the City of Winnipeg Zoning By-law 200/2006. 
Section 57 (8) identifies “parking requirements for each use category or type” as a development regulation that can be modified by a PDO-1.
Section 171 of the City of Winnipeg Zoning by-law identifies three methods for a property owner to adjust the required parking downwards:
Urban Infill Areas – Those areas on maps 1 and 2 of Schedule C. The sections of Academy within the boundaries of the PDO are not within the Urban Infill Areas.
Combination of Uses – When multiple principal uses from different parking categories are located in one building the required parking is reduced to 80% of the aggregate of the required parking for each use on the zoning lot.
Parking Management Plan – An applicant may propose, to the Director, a parking management plan prepared by a professional traffic engineer of traffic consultant that demonstrates that a reduced number of parking spaces is adequate. If the Director concludes that the parking management plan provides adequate parking the Director may reduce the number of required parking spaces.
Q:        Are rooftop patios allowed? If so, what options are available for sound control?
A:        Rooftop patios are allowed.
A rooftop patio for outdoor dining larger than100 sq.ft. requires a conditional use. If it is to be licensed then all of the regulations of the MLCC apply. 
Conditions dealing with sound control could be imposed on a rooftop patio through the conditional use process (e.g. no live bands, no music after 11pm, placement of speakers, etc…)
Q:        Are overhangs allowed above the sidewalk? People felt that overhangs can make it more pedestrian friendly.
A:        Overhangs above a sidewalk can be established.
If the overhang is to project into the right of way, above the city sidewalk, an encroachment agreement is required.
If the overhang extends into a required front yard, beyond the permitted projection identified in the zoning by-law, a variance would be required.
Q:        Subject to the design guidelines of the PDO, will it be any easier/more difficult to change zoning from C1 to C2? From R1 to RMF?
A:        The process to rezone a property within the PDO area does not change with the adoption of a PDO. The PDO will provide additional information to applicants, planners, committee members, elected officials, and the public regarding the established vision for the PDO area when evaluating rezoning applications.
Q:        Character of buildings – metal vs. brick, etc. A resident asked about having building material standards in, such as limiting metal, stucco, or concrete. Is this a realistic option? Are design guidelines like this sometimes used?
.A:       Design guidelines dealing with the particular building materials are sometimes used, however, including provisions as specific as limiting certain finishing materials in a zoning by-law can be problematic. Building materials, finishes, and colors are all matters of opinion that fall in and out of style, if they are to be regulated they must be regulated in a way that is more flexible than a zoning by-law. Focusing on the function of the building and the quality of the design rather than the cladding will create a by-law that is less likely to be misinterpreted and will not create an inordinate number of applications and public hearings (e.g. variances for cladding type).  
It is more appropriate to manage development specific design details through design guidelines which do not form part of the zoning by-law. As part of the implementation of OurWinnipeg the Winnipeg Public Service will be developing an Urban Design Strategy. We expect that Urban Design Guidelines for Neighbourhood Main Streets will be part of this strategy and, once approved by Council, they would apply to Academy Road. 
Q:        Why was the condition that: "drinking establishments…must not be open later than 10 pm all days of the week" removed from the PDO.
A:        The reason we removed this proposal was because a conflict with MLCC regulations which already have a prescribed closing time for drinking establishments allowing them to remain open until a later time. There would be confusion between the two sets of laws; one Provincial and the other City.
The MLCC requires service to seasonal patio areas to cease at 10 pm and the patio area to be vacated by 11 pm.
A Zoning By-law is not the appropriate place to regulate the hours of operation of various establishments which is an operational issue and relates more to licensing and regulation by MLCC. The ZBL designates that drinking establishments are an appropriate use; it is up to the operator to ensure that the facility and the occupants are managed well, is sensitive to the community and meets MLCC requirements.
Q:        An inquiry came up at our visioning workshops on the Academy Road PDO project regarding the "Enderton Caveat".
A:        The City conducted some further investigation into the Enderton Caveat issue which was a Building Restriction Caveat (BRC) that applied to a large part of the Crescentwood area. This BRC is no longer in effect. The Province passed legislation under The Real Property Act a number of years ago that results in any caveat over 50 years old being cancelled. 
Q:        What was the Enderton Caveat?
A:         One of the major components of the Enderton caveat was the establishment of special yard setbacks, but there were also some land use restrictions. MB Historic Society information on the caveat reveals: They (home buyers) were lured in part by a caveat placed on all property in the district specifying required distances that houses be set back from the sidewalk, the minimum amount to be spent on the houses, and strict use limitations including a stipulation that homes be single family dwellings only. Throughout the years, the enforcement of the “Enderton Caveat” by the homeowners’ association maintained the character of the neighbourhood as a desirable area to live, close to downtown and yet providing the gracious ambience of the suburban life style. 
Special alignments were put in place in the unified zoning by-law (Wpg Zoning By-law 6400) to reflect the "Enderton alignments". Those "special yards" have been carried forward in Schedule "I" of the new zoning by-law (Wpg Zoning By-law 200/06) which establishes front yard setbacks along Academy Road.
It appears that the larger setbacks (40-65') may have been established as a result of the Enderton caveat while others may relate to provision for future widenings (7'). Building alignments along the street will also be enforced through the Front Yard Building Alignments section in the Zoning By-law (Section 139).
The caveat is probably still attached to many Certificates of Title in the Crescentwood area. The Manitoba Land Titles Office could not perform a blanket removal of the caveat as the area and number of titles affected was too large. The caveat will be discharged from the titles as property transactions are processed on the affected properties. Owners can also request to have the caveat removed/discharged.
Q:        Why was this PDO not done before, is it in response to potential development?
A:        PDO’s are being created in other areas of the city such as St. Norbert and Transcona as well  PDO’s are a proactive planning measure, that area Councillors have asked the city to take so the communities vision of what it would like to be can be better expressed and implemented.  Q: Will the PDO affect the residential properties?
There will be no changes outside the PDO area, for example residential will stay as residential.
For more information go to:
Your Neighbourhood, your street, your say ...http://www.orlikow.ca/news/view/?nid=147

Categories: Development, Traffic

Why is there no free transit service to Jets games as there are for Bomber games?

Bomber Fane Fare service is subsidised by the Winnipeg Blue Bomber Football Club, which is why this service can be offered. Unfortunately, with the number of games involved in the hockey season it does not look like we can form the same sort of partnership with the Jets Hockey Team.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Transit

Westridge Community Centre Re-Opening

Q: When will the Westridge Community Centre be re-opened?

A: Expected third week of November, 2011
 
Q: What happened to the Westridge Community Centre?
A: On September 10, 2011 there was a fire outside the Westridge Community Centre.
 
Q: What has been done to reopen the Community Centre?
A: Shortly after the fire I spoke with City staff and asked them to take all steps possible to speed the reconstruction process and minimize the closure time of the Community Centre. As such cleanup of the building was initiated immediately after the fire, a structural engineers report was completed promptly, and the tender process was conducted in tandem to the cleaning and structural evaluation.  This saved weeks of time.
 
Q: What is the schedule of the City work to be done at the Community Centre?
A: Insurance, contractor, trades and scope of work are concluded and exterior work will start November 1, 2011 with the installation of the exterior siding. Once the building is made weather tight the interior work can be completed.
 
The City is still awaiting the floorings arrival, when it comes in we have been assured it will be promptly installed. As long as there are no significant delays with the delivery of the new flooring the Community Center should be open in 3 weeks.

Categories: Community Centres

Academy Road Asphalt Over-lay Info

Q: When are overlays used?

A: Overlays are applied to roads that are graded Fair or better. They are used to prolong the life of a road. Several sections of Academy that are graded fair have received overlay in recent years,  most recently Waterloo to Oak.
 
Q: Why wasn’t the Oak to Oxford section of Academy done earlier as it is in the worst shape?
 
A: Academy from Oak to Oxford is graded Poor. As such it did not qualify, as regular overlay deteriorates quickly when applied to poor foundations.
 
Q: What changed?
 
A: The city is testing a new thicker overlay on Academy from Oak to Oxford. This over-lay is unique as it is a new product developed as a treatment for issues associated with similarly poor graded streets.
 
This is a test to see if this new type of asphalt overlay will last over time and be suitable to assist sections of road graded poor. We need to know that the product will be cost effective.
 
This is a temporary measure until Academy can be programed into the Capital budget for rehabilitation and reconstruction.
 
Q: How much did it cost?
 
A: To overlay this section of road it cost $70,000.

Categories: Infrastructure, Roads

Speeding Tickets on Nathaniel

 

Recently Winnipeg Police Services have been ticketing drivers for speeding on Grant just past Nathaniel. An article in the Winnipeg Free Press raised questions about the location and equipment in use. Following are answers to many of the questions constituents have been calling with.

Q: How can I have been going over 50 kms when I just turned the corner?

A: Although the radar equipment may be stationed close to the intersection, the vehicles speed is checked at a spot generally 100 Meters or more away from the corner. This is the length of a city block away from the Nathaniel corner.

Q: What is the maximum range police traffic radar can measure speed?

A: Radar range varies widely with radar, target (size/shape), and weather conditions. Maximum detection range can be as little as 100 feet, or greater than 1 mile

Q: The radar vehicle was to the side of the road, how can it possibly be getting an accurate reading.

A: The radar has a range in which the beam goes out. The best measurements are direct but there is a range. In this particular instance people are concerned that since the radar was at an angle, the reading were registering people speeding inaccurately. While there is a “Cosine effect” that result in less accuracy as the distance from the radar increases, the result is registering a lower speed than is actually traveled at the time. When the error occurs it is in favour of the driver. The Cosine Effect refers to the angle of the target vehicle in relation to the patrol vehicle where the radar is mounted. The traffic radar should be operated as parallel as possible to the targets, although it is hardly possible to do perfectly. When the angle between the radar beam and target becomes too significant, the relative speed will be less than the true speed producing a lesser speed reading than what the vehicle is actually traveling. Thus, the Cosine Effect is always in the favor of the motorist. The greater the angle the lesser the speed will be recorded compared to the actual speed of the moving target.  http://www.radarguns.com/radar-and-cosine-effect.html

Q: How accurate and how often are the Intersection Safety Camera and Mobile Photo Radar camera systems tested?

A: The systems are approved by the Provincial Government of Manitoba Minister of Justice under the Highway Traffic Act Regulation 220/2000. The systems are tested regularly.  For more information on the Image Capturing Enforcement Regulation 220/2002 of the Manitoba Highway Traffic Act, http://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/regs/pdf/h060-220.02.pdf

 

Challenging the Ticket

Q: How do I dispute/challenge/contest this offence notice/ticket?

A: The information is provided on the front and back of your offence notice/ticket.  If you have lost or misplaced a portion of your offence notice/ticket containing the instructions you can view a copy of a blank offence notice/ticket by using the "visit this site" link below and then the link entitled http://www.gov.mb.ca/justice/fines/pdf/photoTicket.pdf (PDF 40Kb).  For further information you can contact or attend the Provincial Court Office at 373 Broadway in Winnipeg (telephone: 945-3156), or any Regional Provincial Court Office.  All Provincial Court Offices are open Monday to Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (excluding holidays). For more information visit the following site http://www.gov.mb.ca/justice/fines/index

Q: Where can I dispute/challenge/contest an offence notice/ticket after it has been paid?

A: Contact or attend the Provincial Court Office at 373 Broadway in Winnipeg (telephone: 945-3156), or any Regional Provincial Court Office.  All Provincial Court Offices are open Monday to Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (excluding holidays). For more information visit the following sitehttp://www.gov.mb.ca/justice/fines/index

Q: I received a photo enforcement offence notice/ticket that I don’t agree with. Who can I contact to further discuss this matter?

A: Once an offence notice/ticket is issued by the City, it becomes a Provincial Court matter. Options are listed on the front and back of the offence notice/ticket as to how you may dispose of or contest the offence notice/ticket.

Contact or attend the Provincial Court Office at 373 Broadway in Winnipeg (telephone: 945-3156), or any Regional Provincial Court Office.  All Provincial Court Offices are open Monday to Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (excluding holidays). For more information visit the following site http://www.gov.mb.ca/justice/fines/index

As these enquiries relate to potential pending court cases, the Winnipeg Police Service is not in a position to comment.  Unless there are special circumstances, such as the vehicle being reported stolen at the time of offence, it would be inappropriate for the Winnipeg Police Service to intervene in any way.


More information:

For more information and FAQ’ please go to City of Winnipeg, Photo Enforcement FAQ’s http://www.winnipeg.ca/police/safestreets/faqs.stm#20

Traffic radar http://www.radarguns.com/radar-and-cosine-effect.html

Fines and traffic tickets Province of MB, http://www.gov.mb.ca/justice/fines/index

Manitoba Highway Traffic Act, http://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/regs/pdf/h060-220.02.pdf

Categories: By-laws, City Hall, Public Safety, Traffic

FAQ for Sterling Lyon Crossing

Q: Why is the train whistling at Sterling Lyon?

A: The City of Winnipeg and CPR have been working towards obtaining whistle cessation at this crossing by upgrading the Sterling Lyon crossing to meet the conditions contained in Transport Canada’s Railway Safety Directorate.  Once Transport Canada confirms the crossing meets these conditions, CPR can issue a special instruction which would prohibit the application of the train whistle at this crossing.  
Q: When will this happen?
A: We are presently waiting for the letter from Transport Canada to CPR to confirm the grade crossing meets the conditions contained in Transport Canada’s Railway Safety Directorate. The City of Winnipeg completed all work required to meet the requirements and CPR submitted an application for whistle cessation to Transport Canada in April 2011. Transport Canada is a federal jurisdiction and the time line is now under their control
Q: What happens once the letter arrives?
A: Once the letter arrives, a whistle cessation Agreement must be drafted and signed by the City and the Railway, then a “no Whistle” sign will be installed at the crossing letting the conductors know that they do not have to blow the whistle at the crossing unless they see a hazard.

Q: Will this mean that there will be no whistling from the crossing?                                                                                                               

A: Conductors must blow the whistle if they see a “hazard” animals or people walking on or near the tracks would be examples of this

Categories: Public Safety, Roads, Traffic

Winnipeg Winter Parking Ban - Q&A

Q: How will I know if there are any parking restrictions on the street I am parking on?

A: In Winnipeg there are a number of winter parking bans that residents should be aware of. Information about all winter parking bans can be found at the following helpful links:

Websitehttp://www.knowyourzone.winnipeg.ca

Brochurehttp://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/Parkingbans/Documents/knowyourzone_en.pdf

Frequently Asked Questionshttp://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/Parkingbans/Documents/FAQ.pdf

The two main winter parking bans that people should be familiar with are:
 

a) The Annual Snow Route Overnight Parking Ban which applies to streets designated as snow routes and is put in place annually from December 1 to March 1 and prohibits parking between 2:00 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. nightly. Every street designated as a Snow Route has Snow Route signs posted within 150 metres of one another and at least one sign on every block. This parking ban is put in place in order to allow for better snow clearing operations on regional and collector streets across the city.

b) The Residential Parking Ban, which applies to residential streets when the City makes the decision to plow residential streets due to large accumulations of snow. All residential streets are assigned to a snow zone (which is identified by a letter of the alphabet). Residential streets will maintain the same snow zone letter of the alphabet for the entire winter season.

When a residential snow clearing operation is required, the City will announce the schedule for clearing of streets by snow zone letters. Residential streets in snow zones will be cleared in 12 hour shifts between 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., and 7:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m.. Under normal conditions, clearing of snow from residential streets will be completed within five 12-hour shifts, but it may take longer depending on plowing conditions. To find out when the residential parking ban will apply to a residential street you would like to park on, you can contact 311 or visit the City of Winnipeg webpage http://www.knowyourzone.winnipeg.ca 

The City will make a public announcement through the media when a Residential Parking Ban is declared.

More answers to questions on Winter Parking Bans is also available here: http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/


Q:  Why are residents being ticketed when there is no snow fall?

A:In the winter, it is essential that priority streets are kept clear of snow to ensure the fast, safe movement of emergency vehicles (ambulance, fire and police). These priority streets are designated as Snow Routes. The City’s Winter Parking Ban By-law (76/2011) prohibits parking between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. from December 1st to March 1st every year on streets designated as Snow Routes.  This ensures that if weather conditions suddenly change and it suddenly snows heavily, crews can start working immediately on the main roads and not have to worry about many vehicles parked on a street. Maneuvering around parked cars slows down the process considerably. Keeping these priority streets free of parked vehicles overnight ensures crews can plow quickly and cover a larger area in a shorter period of time, should it suddenly snow heavily.

Q:  Why doesn’t the City give a warning to drivers parked on snow routes, instead of a fine?

A: The Winnipeg Parking Authority (WPA) did not enforce it for the first week of December. This time was used as an opportunity to educate the public through warning tickets and the distribution of an informational pamphlet. Since that time enforcement has remained consistent, to act as a deterrent. Not enforcing could introduce some level of complacency from the public and may result in residents fighting tickets on the premise that enforcement was not carried out in full accordance or consistently with the By-law. When a snow fall does occur, it is essential that the city complete operations in a timely manner in order to make the streets safer and to effectively and efficiently use our public resources.

Q:  Where is a non-resident supposed to park when all the available parking is marked as a snow route?

A: The City advises that with regards to parking on Winnipeg streets in the winter, vehicle owners/drivers are responsible for finding a place to park their vehicle, and to find a street to park on, which doesn’t have a winter parking ban currently in place.  The City provides information about which streets have winter parking bans in place, at: http://cms00asa1.winnipeg.ca/

On this web page an individual can type in a street address and see what streets currently have a Winter Parking Ban in effect including the Snow Route Overnight Parking Ban.  The map also shows surrounding residential streets where there is no Parking Ban in effect and people can choose to park there.  The City of Winnipeg also operates many surface parking lots throughout the city where vehicles may be parked overnight for a fee.

Q:  What can I do to challenge a ticket?

A: If you would like to challenge a ticket, it is your right to take a ticket to Provincial Court at 373 Broadway between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday. You may plead either ‘not guilty’ or ‘guilty with an explanation’.

In order to appear at Provincial Court you must 1) have the ticket stamped at the Parking Store (495 Portage Ave), and 2) appear within 15 days of the ticket being issued. The province provides no options to contest a ticket by phone.

Q:  I would like to challenge a ticket, but I have difficulty taking the time out of my day due to other commitments. What options do I have?

A: Under provincial law, the City of Winnipeg must have a ticket stamped in order for the ticket-holder to challenge a ticket before a public hearing. If as a ticket-holder, you are unable to have it stamped, you may have somebody else get it stamped on your behalf so long as you provide a signed letter giving permission to do so. This permission must come from the registered owner of the vehicle.

The purpose of having the ticket stamped is for review before it goes forward. For example, if there was in fact a license plate or date error, this would allow The Parking Authority to catch this before it went to the Provincial Courts.

Q:  What can I do if I the ticket was given in error?

A: If the ticket was given in error, you may have the ticket reviewed by the Winnipeg Parking Authority. This can be done online at:

http://theparkingstore.winnipeg.ca/theparkingstore/

A review is limited to a determination of whether or not there were errors in the issuance of the ticket. The review must be requested within 15 days of the ticket being issued. The ticket is reviewable if you think the patrol officer recorded the wrong: location, date, make of vehicle, violation, or license plate. Anything else requires an attendance at Provincial Court.

Q: What was the purpose of changing the residential snow plowing system?

A: Having the residential streets clear of parked cars allows for better snow clearing operations in terms of improved public safety, safety of equipment operators, and higher quality of snow clearing. In addition, the City realizes better use of public funds by not having to replow the streets once the cars have been removed. Under the former ban, parking was restricted for a six hour period while snow clearing operations continued on a 24-hour basis.

Q: Is the city taking any feedback on the Winter Parking Ban?

 
A: You can give feedback or suggestions to City staff by contacting 311, which can be passed on to the department for consideration at your request. Please feel free to provide any policy suggestions or concerns to my attention at 986-5236 and I can look into this on your behalf.
 
Q: Can I have the Snow Route Overnight Parking Ban changed on my Street?

A: The City has found that one of the keys to having our citizens be respectful of the Snow Route Overnight Parking Ban is clear and consistent regulation. Therefore the Snow Route Overnight Parking Ban must be applied in a similar manner on all city streets that are designated as Snow Routes. If any exceptions are made, it tends to quickly make the ban much more confusing to the public and ultimately less effective in limiting the parked cars impacting on the City’s snow clearing operations.

If you feel there is good reason that a street or a portion thereof should not be designated as a Snow Route, you can bring this to my attention and I will follow up with the City administration, making sure that either I or the administration will get back to you regarding this concern.

Categories: By-laws, Snow Removal

Kenaston Widening from Taylor to Ness

A motion to accept Option 4 for the widening of Kenaston Blvd from Taylor to Ness was presented to Council and approved. Preliminary information about this plan is available on the City of Winnipeg website at the following address:


 

http://winnipeg.ca/publicworks/MajorProjects/Route90/


 

 


 

Council meeting information:


 

http://winnipeg.ca/clkdmis/ViewPdf.asp?SectionId=298777


 

 


 

Background


 

 


 

In 2007 the City conducted a preliminary design study for Route 90 between Ness and Taylor, which focused on improvements in areas such as safety, vehicular operations, Transit operations, Active Transportation opportunities, capital cost, and reducing neighbourhood and property impacts; such as reducing vehicular emissions, attenuating traffic noise and reducing neighbourhood shortcutting.


 

 


 

FAQ


 

 


 

Q:        Why is the Kenaston Expansion Project needed?


 

 


 

A:         Route 90 is a vital north-south transportation corridor linking major residential, employment and commercial areas in the southwest and northwest quadrants of the City. It is a major truck route and is the Winnipeg link in the Mid-Continental Trade Corridor. Already one of Winnipeg’s busiest thoroughfares, Route 90’s role in the movement of people and goods will expand with developments.


 

 


 

City standards provide justification for widening to six lanes when the traffic volume reaches 35,000 vehicles per day. The current volume is over 50,000 vehicles per day. The volume is expected to increase to 70,000 per day by 2030 due to new development projects to the south. Insufficient capacity results in congestion and regional traffic spilling onto residential streets not designed for this traffic.


 

 


 

Q:        What does the preferred alignment look like?


 

 


 

A:         The preferred alignment expands Kenaston on either side of the current roadway. The portion that will have the most impact is that to the north of Tuxedo, where the proposed alignment expands slightly to the north. A detailed map is available here:


 

 


 

 


 

Q:        What would the road and the intersections look like?


 

 


 

A:         A cross-section of the street is available here:
 


 

 


 

Q:        Where is the process presently at?


 

 


 

A:         The preliminary design has been approved by the City of Winnipeg Council. The project cannot start, however, without Federal Government financial support. Until this support is secured, no construction will begin.


 

 


 

Q:        Can the project begin before the Kapyong Barrack and Air Force Housing issues are negotiated?


 

 


 

A:         Yes, the major work will involve adding an additional span to the St. James Bridge and re-alignment which can be done in a first stage. This would still require Federal Government funding and would add to the over-all cost of the project.


 

 


 

Q:        Where are negotiations regarding the Kapyong Barracks lands and acquisition of a row of the PMQ (military base) housing?


 

 


 

A:         Pending. Timelines are not available at this point however this motion will be used to help move matter forward at the Federal level.


 

 


 

Q:        What steps were taken to consult with the public?


 

 


 

Community residents and businesses were consulted for this plan. These public consultations included first person interviews, small meetings, survey questionnaires and two public open houses between fall 2008 and fall 2009. A diagram of the consultation process is available here:


 


 

 


 

Citizen comments are available here:


 


 

 


 

In addition, I have taken it upon myself to speak with and meet local residents, find answers to questions, and to provide periodic updates for this project on my website. I have brought forward the concerns addressed by local residents and the broader community to the project manager and to Council before voting on this decision.


 

 


 

Q:        How will this affect the River Heights/Ft. Garry Ward?


 

 


 

A:         The proposed expansion will reduce commercial and through-traffic along adjacent streets for a time.


 

 


 

In order to reduce traffic noise levels, sound attenuation walls are proposed. The walls would range in height from 2.4m in rear or side yards to 1.2m in front yards. Removal of the local street and lane connections to Kenaston Boulevard will allow for longer continuous sections and more effective sound attenuation.


 

 


 

The new intersection alignments at Grant and Kenaston and Corydon and Kenaston will address safety issues.


 

 


 

Directly adjacent to Kenaston, 64 homes in the River Heights / Fort Garry Ward will need to be partially and fully expropriated in order to expand the road. (find out how many full as Corydon is less and increases at you go to Academy.)


 

 


 

In addition, an access road will connect Boulton Bay residents to Taylor, in order to better accommodate southbound traffic originating on Boulton Bay.


 

 


 

Q: How will Active Transportation be accommodated in the new design?


 

 


 

A:         The proposed plan has a sidewalk on each side and a cycling path along the west side of Kenaston between Wellington Cres to the north and through the Kenaston underpass to the south. The plan recommends that the City connect the cycling path with other existing active transportation paths in the area. The plan also recommends a pedestrian and cyclist overpass across Kenaston at Lockston Avenue.


 

 


 

Q: Will there be an active transportation trail on the East side?


 

 


 

A:         The plan has not been finalized however attempts will be made to get an active transportation trail on the East side however there may not be the room available.


 

 


 

Q: How will the new plans affect transit? Is there room for a future rapid Transit route along this corridor?


 

 


 

Route 90 has also been identified as a potential transit quality corridor in the City’s Transportation Master Plan. A Transit Quality Corridor is a major transit corridor that has a comprehensive set of coordinated transit priority measures.


 

 


 

Potential improvements for Transit operations along the proposed Kenaston expansion include queue-jump lanes, transit priority signals, upgraded centralized transit stops and real-time scheduling information displays. The location and specific types of improvements for each intersection will be determined at the detailed design stage.


 

 


 

Q:        What other options were considered for the Kenaston Widening?


 

 


 

A:         Five conceptual alternatives for widening Route 90 were developed by the project consultant team and an interdepartmental project steering committee and presented to the public at a two day open house event in January 2009. These options included the following:


 

 


 

Option 1 - Widen Kenaston on the west side


 

Option 2 - Widen Kenaston on the east side


 

Option 3 - Widen Kenaston on both sides


 

Option 4 - Widen Kenaston on alternating sides


 

Option 5 - One-Way Pair using the former Oak Point Rail line for northbound lanes


 

 


 

The three highest rated alternatives (Options 1, 4, and 5) underwent preliminary design and further assessment taking into account comments received during the initial Open House event. The resulting preliminary designs were then presented to the public at a second Open House event held in November 2009.


 

 


 

At both Open House events Option 4 (Widening on alternating sides) received the highest rating by the public and by the project steering committee and was therefore selected as the recommended widening option.


 

 


 

The most significant disadvantages of the other four options are the following:


 

 


 

Option 1 Widen West - This option was the second most preferred option; however, it requires land from the Manitoba Youth Centre and results in a poor alignment with the St. James Bridges.


 

 


 

Option 2 Widen East - This option was considered infeasible due to the substantial negative impact upon commercial and condominium properties. It requires the acquisition of developed properties on the east side for the full length of Kenaston Boulevard including all privately owned homes on the east side of Kenaston Boulevard.


 

 


 

Option 3 Widen on Both Sides - The property acquisitions necessary for this alternative are the highest of the 5 options. It requires removal of all homes on both sides of Kenaston Boulevard, yet offers no operational improvement compared to the preferred option 4.


 

 


 

Option 5 One Way Pair - While this option performs nearly as well as the other 4 options it creates an island effect, surrounding a pocket of homes and Carpathia School with high traffic volumes and introduces high traffic volumes into areas that currently carry only moderate residential traffic volumes. It also separates northbound and southbound transit movements making transferring more difficult. Due to recent building projects within the former Oak Point rail right-of-way the property acquisition costs for this alternative could be as much as $15M higher than the recommended alignment. By separating the northbound and southbound lanes, this option would also double the number of individual signalized intersections between Taylor Avenue and Academy Road.


 

 


 

Q: Has the City considered having a raised highway?


 

 


 

A: The enormous capital expense and ongoing maintenance costs, the added expropriation needed for onramps and off-ramps, and detrimental effects to the neighbourhood being under a freeway make this option an impractical solution for Kenaston.


 

 

Categories: City Hall, Infrastructure, Roads

Winnipeg Golf Courses Request of Interest

Q: What is the City considering regarding the future of publically owned golf courses in the City of Winnipeg?

A: The City sent out of Request of Interest (ROI) to developers and private golf operators to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) proposal for the development and/or operation of one or more of the following City-owned golf courses. What this means is that the City asked developers and private golf operators to propose plans for City-owned golf course land.
Q: Why?
A: A City of Winnipeg golf course audit indicated that golf services are not breaking even as independent semi-private businesses. The audit recommended that the City get out of the golf business and sell green space for development.
Q: What golf courses are available for development?
A: Canoe Club, Crescent Drive, Harbour View, John Blumberg, Kildonan Park, Tuxedo, Windsor Park were all included in the ROI.
 
Q: Are other options than continued golf or development available to repurpose the lands?
A: Not at this time
Q: Has the public been consulted?
A: Not at this point. Attempts to have public consultation have been blocked by a majority of Councillors. The rational for not allowing public input at this time is that the consultation process would begin when/if a development proposal comes forward.
Q: Why do some Councillors want to begin the public consultation process before development proposals are determined?
A: Providing developers first option on public green space requires the public to fight inappropriate developments through an adversarial rezoning process. Developers should know what lands and types of development are appropriate before submitting options. Allowing public consultations before the development proposals would allow the public to be proactive in providing input into the uses of these lands, rather than being limited to the reactive role in responding to developer proposals.
Q: Is there any protection for Heritage and Environmentally significant lands located in golf courses?
A: There is a policy that the City identifies and protects such lands, however, a motion that I presented to Council to ensure this policy is followed was rejected by a majority of Council. The policy may be followed, however, it should be done before any ROI process begins to identify what lands are potentially available for repurposing and/or are subject to appropriate development.
Q: How many votes of Council are required if a development proposal is submitted to develop or lease lands on City owned golf courses?
 A: The sale or lease of public lands requires 2/3 of Council to approve the sale.
Q: When will the matter come before Council for consideration?
A: It is expected that some information will come before Council in mid-March 2012, however, that decision is up to the Mayor’s discretion.
Q: Where is the opportunity for the public to have its voice heard regarding any development on golf courses?
A: There will be opportunities for the public to fight any inappropriate development after the proposals are presented to Council but there will not be the opportunity to explore alternative uses of the green space before development proposals are submitted.
Q: What is the general outline of the process going forward?
A: The general steps that the process will take are:
1)    The sucessful proposals will be submitted to Council after the City Administration reviews the proposals. The first one is expected March 2012. 
2)    2/3 of Council would have to agree to lease and/or sale any golf course lands.
3)    A rezoning process would have to occur to change the zoning from Parkland to whatever zoning charges are required by the applicant.
Q: The Mayor has accused me of playing games. What indicators are available to justify my concerns?
A: My concerns arise from:
-          The Golf Audit’s claim that Winnipeg has too much green space and the Mayor’s unwillingness to publically support that claim or not.
-          The EOI process invited only golf operators and developers to provide ideas relating to golf services and/development proposals. The process excluded the public and non-profit groups.
-          There is a need to find new money due to significant budgetary challenges this year and for the next few years
-          Council “killed” a motion that would have had the City conduct an Environmental Sensitive Natural Land Assessment as per the Cities policy.
-          Committee “killed” a motion to provide the public an opportunity to provide ideas on how they see golf course space being used, which includes continued golf, seniors park, dog park, river trails, a cross-country running and skiing facility, a seniors centre, etc.  images/userfiles/City Centre public consultation Motion.pdf
 
 
 
Q: How many acres of land are available for possible development?
 
 
A: There are 687 acres of land available through the EOI, equal to $50 Million dollars.

 

Categories: City Hall, Development, Green Space

How Do I Get Speed Humps For My Street Or Alley?

Q: What are speed humps?

A: As described in the Transportation Association of Canada’s (TAC) Canadian Guide to Neighbourhood Traffic Calming, “a speed hump is a raised area of a roadway, which deflects both the wheels and frame of a traversing vehicle. … [Speed humps are] intended to produce sufficient discomfort to limit travel speeds yet allow the driver to maintain vehicle control. Its design is intended to limit effects on emergency, maintenance and transit vehicles while allowing cyclists to comfortably cross the speed hump.”


Q: How do they work?

A: Speed humps have been proven to have substantial benefits in reduction of vehicle speeds (Source: TAC). However, speed humps are not intended to address issues of high traffic volumes - studies of speed hump installations have shown only minor reductions in traffic volumes.

Speed humps provide a gradual rise and fall and are designed to prevent vehicle damage when traversed at the recommended speeds (indicated with advisory speed signs). The dimensions of a speed hump are approximately 4.0 metres (13 feet) wide and 80 mm (3 inches) high.

Q: What are the steps/ conditions to getting speed humps in a street or alley?
A: The Warrant Criteria, or steps, to getting a speed hump are as follows:
 
Warrant Criteria #1: The street/ alley is a local residential street and is not a Transit route, snow route or a residential collector street.  If this is criteria is met go to Warrant Criteria #2

 

Warrant Criteria #2: Submission of a petition representing a minimum of 70% of the residents in the block (one signature per residence) on both sides of the street in support of the installation/removal of speed humps. Petitions can be found at: http://winnipeg.ca/publicworks/trafficControl/trafficCalming/speedHumps.stm

 

If this is criteria is met the City Traffic Department will perform a traffic study of the street/ alley. These studies are scheduled in the spring and fall while school is still in and the traffic volumes are at their highest. This gives the most accurate reading of the peek volume and speed.

 

Warrant Criteria #3: At least one of the following criteria is met:

 

(i) Average speed exceeds the speed limit (50 km/hour) for streets, (30 Km/hours) for alleys; or


 

(ii) At least 15% of vehicles exceed the speed limit by 5 km/hour or more (55 km/hour); or


 

(iii) At least 10% of vehicles exceed the speed limit by 10 km/hour or more (60 km/hour).

 

 

More information and petition forms can be found at the City of Winnipeg website: 

 

Speed Hump Brochure:

 

Warrant criteria speed humps on streets: http://winnipeg.ca/publicworks/Transportation/pdf/Warrant_Criteria_Installation_Guidelines_-_Street_Humps.pdf

 
Warrant criteria speed humps on lanes: 

http://winnipeg.ca/publicworks/Transportation/pdf/Warrant_Criteria_-_Speed_Humps_in_Lanes.pdf


 

 

Categories: City Hall, Infrastructure, Public Safety, Roads, Traffic

Process for Getting a Loading Zone for Persons with Disabilities

Q: I have a physical disability and would like to have a loading zone in front of my home, clear of parked cars. How can I have this done?

A: If you qualify, you may have a loading zone in front of your home, restricting parking during specified hours. This requires a Disability Permit through the Society of Manitobans with Disabilities (SMD). To get the permit, a form needs to be filled out by a doctor and approved. You can contact SMD at 975-3010 for more information on obtaining and completing this form.

Once you have a disability permit, you can contact 311 to request a loading zone in front of your home, where nobody may park during specified hours. Somebody from the department will then contact you to discuss the hours and any other information needed. If approved, the loading sign will then be put up in between six and eight weeks by the City, allowing you access to the street clear of parked cars between the specified hours.

Categories: Roads

SpeedWatch, a Program from MPI to help Educated Drivers.

 

Q: What is Speedwatch?


 

 


 

A: Speedwatch is an MPI Program aimed at educating drivers about the actual speeds they are traveling on our roads and city streets.


 

Local volunteers borrow radar operated speed reader boards that display the posted speed limit as well as the driver’s speed. This educates the driver about the speed they are traveling and sends the message that speeding in our community is not acceptable. The aim is to prompt speeding drivers to slow down while giving positive reinforcement to those who choose to stay within the speed limit.


 

Q: How does it work?


 

A: Local volunteers borrow radar operated speed reader boards that display the posted speed limit and the driver’s speed. They set up this equipment in a safe location off the road where drivers can see it, during the days and times when the volunteers feel speeding is the worst. Information about how fast drivers are traveling is forwarded to Manitoba Public Insurance for analysis.


 

The reward for volunteers is the knowledge that they are sending the message that speeding in their community is not acceptable. The volunteers can get an analysis of the results from MPI


 

Q: How does the program affect traffic?


 

 


 

A: The program is designed to:


 

a)      Make drivers more aware of the speeds at which they are traveling by giving them a visual signal of their speed;


 

b)      Prompt speeding drivers to slow down by comparing how fast they are traveling to the actual posted speed limit on the road.


 

 


 

Q: Who do I contact?


 

A: To participate in any SpeedWatch program, please contact:


 

SpeedWatch Coordinator
Road Safety Department
Manitoba Public Insurance
985–8737; toll-free 1–888–767–7640


 

Q: What do I have to do for the program?


 

 


 

A: MPI will supply everything you need to make your SpeedWatch program a success including


 

-          Speed Reader Boards


 

-          tracking sheets


 

-          speeding information


 

-          instructions on how to set up and take down the speed reader boards


 

 


 

All that is required of you and your team is:


 

a)      Volunteers to stay with the board while it is in operation for the purposes of safety, vandalism and theft prevention, and to record vehicle numbers and speeds for analysis purposes


 

b)      A commitment to return to MPI any stats collected during your SpeedWatch program so we can use the information to further enhance the MPI Road Safety Education Programming


 

 


 


 

Categories: City Hall, Public Safety, Roads, Traffic

How Do I Address Through Traffic On My Street?

Increasingly, citizens are requesting measures to address their concerns regarding speeding vehicles traveling through their residential neighbourhoods. Often these concerns are related to issues of pedestrian and child safety.


 

There are two methods to address this problem in the community,


 

The MPI SpeedWatch program, Follow this link for more information -
 
and the installation of Speedhumps. Follow this link for more information - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=86

Categories: City Hall, Public Safety, Roads, Traffic

Kenaston Extension FAQ

 

Q: How will the traffic flow be guided through Waverley West from Kenaston Blvd, and how will the westbound traffic on Bishop Grandin Bv. be directed into Waverley West?


 

 


 

A: The segment of Kenaston Blvd currently under construction will connect North Town Rd (in Waverley West) to Bishop Grandin Blvd and be open to traffic later this fall. This is the first stage of the larger project extending Kenaston Blvd to the perimeter highway. This larger project includes construction of a "flyover" bridge to provide free flow for southbound Kenaston to eastbound Bishop Grandin Bv traffic.


 

 


 

Q: How will this connection be made to direct westbound traffic from Bishop Grandin Bv into Waverley West, and to direct traffic from Waverley West onto Bishop Grandin Bv.?


 

 


 

A: Initially (prior to construction of the bridge), all traffic movements will flow through a signalized intersection at Bishop Grandin Bv and Kenaston. Upon the opening of the bridge, all traffic moving between the existing Kenaston Bv and Bishop Grandin Bv will be free flowing (southbound to eastbound via the bridge and westbound to northbound via two by-pass lanes), while traffic moving to and from the extended portion of Kenaston will travel through a signalized intersection.


 

 


 

Q: Will pictures become available so we can see what is proposed?


 

 


 

A: We will soon have some diagrams up under the Major Projects page of the City website: http://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/majorprojects/


 

 

Categories: Infrastructure, Roads, Traffic

What do I do if I have a problem with Geese?

The City of Winnipeg understands that many of our green spaces are not accessible due to geese dropping and have responded by setting up the Canada Goose Citizens' Information Network

The City of Winnipeg is providing groups and individuals the opportunity to learn techniques to encourage or discourage Canada geese particularly around retention basins and in parks. 

As part of this project, we will also be monitoring geese populations in the city.

This will require gathering information about the locations of nests and numbers of geese in selected areas.

Categories: Green Space, Infrastructure, Sustainability

Secondary Suites Q&A

 

Winnipeg is currently in the process of preparing new legislation to allow for secondary suites. A Secondary suite is a second and subordinate housing unit added to a single lot. It can either be attached or detached to the primary home.


 

 


 

Q: What are secondary suites?


 

A: A Secondary suite is a second housing unit added to a single lot. It has frequently been referred to as a Granny Flat. It can either be attached or detached from the existing house/dwelling. In either case, the secondary suite is smaller in size than the main house /dwelling. It has its own entrance, bathroom and kitchen facilities.

 

For more information go to:


 

·         Secondary Suite Technical Information FAQ - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=93


 

·         Secondary Suites Neighbourhood Impact - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=92


 

·         Secondary Suite Application and Appeal Processes FAQ - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=94

Categories: City Hall

Secondary Suites Neighbourhood Impact

 

Q: Will Secondary suites change the character of my neighborhood?


 

A: Secondary suites do not change the design/ character of existing neighbourhoods. Properties with secondary suites generally mimic the existing built form.


 

 


 

Q: Will this affect my Property value?


 

A: No decrease in property value is expected. Based on several studies recently completed in Vancouver, existing neighbourhoods have not shown a decrease in property values.


 

 


 

Q: Will secondary suites affect street parking?


 

A: To minimize the impact of on-street parking, the proposed by-law requires that all houses with secondary suite have a minimum of two parking spots on the lot. The current zoning bylaw requires that single-family homes require only one parking spot.


 

 


 

Q: Will Secondary suites cause a significant impact on traffic?


 

A: No significant increase in traffic is expected as a result of secondary suites.


 

 


 

Q: Can both the main residence and the secondary suite be rented out?


 

A: There is nothing in the bylaw that requires the primary dwelling to be owner-occupied.


 

 


 

Q: Where can I find more information about secondary suites?


 

A: Public Open Houses Poster Boards, February 2012:


 


 

 


 

Report brought to the Standing Policy Committee on Property and Development on April 10th:


 


 

 


 

You can contact my office at 204-986-5236 or by email at jorlikow@winnipeg.ca to bring forward any questions or concerns that you may have.
 
For more information go to:

·         Secondary suites Q&A - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=91

·         Secondary Suite Technical Information FAQ - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=93

·         Secondary Suite Application and Appeal Processes FAQ - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=94

Categories: City Hall

Secondary Suite Technical Information FAQ

 

Q: What are the different forms that a secondary suite can take?


 

A:


 

·         Stand Alone Secondary suite - a suite in a stand-alone building separate from the principal dwelling and the garage


 

·         Secondary suite within the existing dwelling above grade – a suite contained within the principal dwelling above the basement


 

·         Garage Secondary suite at grade – a suite contained within the garage at ground level


 

·         Secondary suite within the existing dwelling below grade – a suite contained within the basement of the principal dwelling


 

·         Garage Secondary suite above grade – a suite above the garage


 

 


 

Q: Are Secondary suites currently allowed in Winnipeg?


 

A: Attached secondary suites are currently allowed in Winnipeg.


 

 


 

Q: Can a property have more than one secondary suite?


 

A: No. Any lot approved for a secondary suite may only have one attached or detached secondary suite.


 

 


 

Q: How big is a secondary suite?


 

A: Attached Secondary suite, if above ground, must be no more than one third of the living area, up to a maximum of 800 square feet.


 

Detached secondary suite may have no more than 600 square feet of floor space. The height may be no more than 15 feet if it is a stand-alone unit, or 25 feet if it is above a garage.


 

 


 

Q: Has the City held any public consultations regarding Secondary suites?


 

A: the City held general Public Open Houses (February 22 & 23, 2012 Millennium Library) and consulted the following groups: Neighbourhood Revitalization Corporations (Spence, West Broadway, North End, Central, Daniel Macintyre), Right to Housing Coalition, Province of Manitoba (Local Government Department & Housing Community Development Department), Chair of the Housing Steering Committee – Winnipeg.


 

 


 

Q: How will Secondary suites benefit my neighbourhood?


 

A: There are a number of benefits such as:


 

·         A home owner who chooses to have a secondary suite can provide an independent home for family members.


 

·         It will provide homes with secondary suites more options for upkeep and maintenance of existing housing stock.


 

·         It will provide an additional opportunity for people to remain and maintain their homes. 


 

·         Secondary suites provide neighbourhood benefit resulting from increased density in a low impact manner.


 

·         It provides an alternative to converting historic homes into duplexes, triplexes and other multi-unit buildings.


 

·         Private landscaping and front doors help to beautify a back lane while bringing eyes to the property increases security.


 

 


 

Q: How are Secondary suites part of healthy communities?


 

·         Supports Complete Communities - Secondary suites provide a diversity of housing types which supports the ability to ‘age in place’,


 

·         Promotes smart development – increase density and therefore, could reduce some development pressure for greenfield development.


 

·         Design and Character - Secondary suites do not change the design/ character of existing neighbourhoods. Properties with secondary suites mimic the existing built form,


 

·         Addresses the historical decline in household size – Secondary suites add more people to the community without increasing the land supply. This strengthens the ability for neighbourhood services and amenities to survive, such as schools, libraries, and transit.


 

 


 

Q: What is the difference between a duplex and an attached secondary suite?


 

A: An Attached Secondary suite is accessory and smaller than a primary dwelling, whereas each duplex or side-by-side units are both primary dwelling units. Secondary suites also tend to be more hidden because only one entrance to a home may be located in the front of the primary dwelling unit, meaning the entrance to the secondary suite will not be at the front of the house.

 

For more information go to:


 

·         Secondary suites Q&A - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=91


 

·         Secondary Suites Neighbourhood Impact - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=92


 

·         Secondary Suite Application and Appeal Processes FAQ - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=94

Categories: City Hall

Secondary Suite Application and Appeal Processes FAQ

 

Q: How do I apply for a secondary suite?


 

A: If this legislation is approved:


 

·         Attached Secondary Suite -an applicant will be required to provide notification to the neighbourhood and get a development permit application for an attached secondary suite. If the plan does not conform to use specific standards then an additional conditional use application is required, which is subject to a public hearing before the Board of Adjustment.


 

·         Detached secondary suite - will require a conditional use application subject to a public hearing before the board of adjustment. It will also require plan approval from the Director of Planning, Property and Development, and approval of a Development Permit application.


 

 


 

Q: What can I do if I do not approve of secondary suites on my street?


 

A: If you do not approve a detached secondary suite, you may go to a public hearing and state the reasons for your objection. If you do not approve an attached secondary suite there is 14 days’ notice period to appeal the application.


 

 


 

Q: Is there an appeal process for secondary suites?


 

A: Yes, but two different formats:


 

·         An attached secondary suite notice would have to be posted for 14 days - and if it was appealed by any neighbours, a public hearing would be required.  If there is no appeal, then it is approved.


 

·         A detached secondary suite is approved through a public hearing process including the right to appeal. If the decision is appeal, the proposal will then be brought to the Appeal Committee for an appeal hearing. . The Appeal Committee decision is binding.


 

For more information go to:


 

·         Secondary suites Q&A - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=91


 

·         Secondary Suites Neighbourhood Impact - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=92


 

·         Secondary Suite Technical Information FAQ - http://www.orlikow.ca/faq/view/?fid=93

Categories: City Hall

What are Community Resource Recovery Centres Outlined in the Waste Reduction Strategy?

 

Community Resource Recovery Centres will be established in the north, south, east, and west areas of the city. Residents will be able to drop off material that can be processed and reused, resold, or recycled for a $5 fee. This will increase waste diversion.


 

 


 

Q: When would these Centres be ready?


 

A: The first Centre at Brady Road Landfill could be operating in 2013, the second Centre would be in the north area of the city and could be operating in 2014 and the remaining two Centres (east area and west area) could be operating as early as 2015 and 2016.


 

 


 

Q: How much would it cost to drop off items at the Centres?


 

A: There would a $5.00 charge per visit if you are bringing items that require landfill disposal (e.g., drywall, shingles, renovation material, furniture, mattresses).


 

 


 

Q: Could residents take garbage to the Community Resource Recovery Centres?


 

A: No. The intent of the Centres is resource recovery and would not serve as a landfill or a landfill transfer station. Residents would be encouraged to drop off material that could be resold, reused or recycled.


 

 

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

Does the Waste Reduction Strategy Include a Curbside Yard Collection Program?

 

Q: What is the curbside waste collection program?


 

A: The City will be introducing curbside yard waste collection to provide residents an easy and convenient way to recycle their grass clippings and yard waste throughout the growing season.


 

 


 

Q: How does the Curbside Yard Waste program work?


 

A: Once every two weeks from April to November, residents can put their yard waste at the curb on their collection day, and the yard waste will be collected and composted. This program has the potential to keep 25,000 tonnes of organic material out of the landfill each year.


 

 


 

Q: When will it start?


 

A: this program will start the same time as the new garbage and recycling program.


 

 


 

Q: What kind of containers and bags would be required for leaf and yard waste collection?


 

A: Residents would be required to use compostable leaf and yard waste bags, or hard-walled containers (e.g., standard sized garbage can, blue boxes). Plastic bags would not be accepted as they are not biodegradable and would contaminate the finished compost.


 

 


 

Q: What would you do with the organic material collected from the curbside yard waste program?


 

A: The yard waste would be composted at the Brady Road Landfill site. Initially the finished compost would be used as a landfill cover material and made available to other City departments for soil amendment needs. Once the quality and quantity of the compost material has been proven, it could be marketed for sale.


 

 


 

Q: Would you continue to operate the seasonal yard waste depots once the curbside yard waste program is in place?


 

A: No. Since unlimited residential yard waste would be collected biweekly from spring to fall, there would no longer be a need for the seasonal depots. Yard waste could also be dropped off at one of the Community Resource Recovery Centres.


 

 


 

Q: Would the City continue to operate the annual Christmas tree depots?


 

A: Yes, because the curbside yard waste collection program would end in November each year.

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

How Will the Waste Reduction Strategy Affect Seniors and People with Disabilities?

 

Q: What about seniors and disabled persons unable to move the containers? What do they do?


 

A: Seniors and People with disability can apply for the “Walk Up Collection Service”


 

 


 

Q: What is walk-up collection service?


 

A: Our collectors will walk up to your home, empty and return any recycling and garbage containers.


 

 


 

Q: Who is eligible for this service?


 

A: Residents who:


 

·         have difficulty getting their recycling and garbage to the curb or lane, and


 

·         have no one who can do this for them.


 

 


 

Q: Is there a charge?


 

A: No.


 

 


 

Q: How do I apply?


 

A: Complete the application form found at http://www.winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/pdfs/walk-upServiceApplication.pdf and return it to the City of Winnipeg. Our staff will visit your home to determine the best location for setting out your garbage and recycling.


 

 


 

Q: Do I need a note from my physician?


 

A: No.


 

 


 

Q: How long can I receive the service?


 

A: We will provide the service as long as you need it. However, you need to reapply for the service each year. It is up to you to let us know if you no longer need the service or if there is a change in your service requirement (e.g., address change).


 

 


 

Q: How long before I know if I qualify for the service?


 

A: One or two weeks. We will phone you.

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

What Impact Will the Waste Reduction Strategy Have on Brady Road Landfill?

 

Q: Would the garbage tipping fees increase at Brady Road Landfill once the recommendations are implemented?


 

A: We would review the tipping fee structure after the recycling services are in place.


 

 


 

Q: Are you recommending garbage and recycling service changes because there is a concern about the limited capacity of the Brady Landfill?


 

A: No, the priority of the master plan is to benefit the environment and Brady Road Landfill by:


 

keeping valuable resources out of the landfill reducing harmful effects of garbage in the landfill


 

 


 

NON-RESIDENTIAL SECTORS


 

 


 

Q: Would you add programs for other sectors, such as industrial, commercial?


 

A: The City has begun consulting with other sectors and would expect to develop new diversion (recycling) opportunities as we identify them.

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

Is There a Curbside Kitchen Waste Collection Trial Program Included with the Waste Reduction?

 

Q: Why are you only planning a trial program for the curbside kitchen waste collection program?


 

A: We need to measure the interest and participation so that we can determine the best collection methods and the most efficient and economical composting facilities to handle the material.


 

 


 

Q: When would the trial program take place?


 

A: Since there would already be significant change taking place for garbage and recycling collection services in 2012 and 2013, we would start the trial once the transition to the collection services has stabilized, likely as early as 2014.


 

 


 

Q: Could residents express an interest in being part of the kitchen organics collection trial program?


 

A: Yes. The trial area hasn’t been determined yet, but we would welcome interest from residents. If you are interested in the program you can contact

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

What Type of Education/Consultation Has Been Done Related to the Waste Reduction Plan?

 

Q: What sort of information was sent out regarding this plan?


 

A: There were Community Consultations were held throughout Winnipeg


 

· Eleven open houses were held throughout the city, which included the Crescentwood Community Centre.


 

· Several round tables were also held at the Millennium Library focusing on accessibility and environment in addition to the Speak Up on Garbage Expo at the Convention Centre.


 

· Information and requests for feedback were posted on the City of Winnipeg web site.


 

· Information was posted on Councillor Orlikow’s website with requests for feedback.


 

· 4000 postcards were dropped in the Ward with a link to the Councillor’s website asking for feedback.


 

 


 

Q: Have other cities adopted a similar program?


 

A: Winnipeg is not the only city to switch to a form of automated garbage collection. Below are a few examples of nearby or similar cities to Winnipeg that have already converted.


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


 

Q: How would you inform residents about the service changes and opportunities?


 

A: We would prepare a comprehensive promotion and education plan. Detailed information would be included with each cart.

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

How Will the Waste Reduction Service Affect Other Waste Pick Up?

 

Q: How do I get rid of my bulky waste items (e.g., furniture, mattresses)?


 

A: Bulky waste can be collected for a fee of $5.00 per item, up to a maximum of ten items per collection, for all customers city-wide. Call 311 to arrange pick up.


 

 


 

Q: Would the abandoned waste collection program continue?


 

A: Yes. This service would continue to be funded as part of the garbage collection service. You can report abandoned waste by contacting the 311 Centre by phone, or email and the abandoned waste will be collected.


 

 


 

Q: Is an increase in abandoned waste expected if the recommendations are implemented?


 

A: No. In fact a decrease is expected in abandoned waste due to removal of the shared AutoBin system, a more user-friendly bulky waste collection program and fee structure, and the opportunity for residents to take reusable items to a Community Resource Recovery Centre.


 

 


 

For additional information the following PDF is available.


 

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

How Will the Waste Reduction Strategy Affect Landlords and Tenants?

 

Q: I am a renter in a single-family dwelling/house. Does this affect me?


 

A: If the water bill is in your name, you will be responsible for the quarterly fee for garbage service. If the water bill is in the property owner’s name, the garbage collection fee may be added to your monthly rent.


 

 


 

Note: The carts belong to the property and not the resident. If you move, you must leave the carts behind.


 

 


 

Q: I am a property owner with renters. What does this mean for me?


 

A: As the property owner, you would be responsible for ensuring the carts are available for your tenants and, if the water bill is in your name, the fee.

Categories: City Hall, Waste Removal

City Booklet on New Waste and Recycling Services

The City of Winnipeg will be launching a new waste and recycling "Waste Reduction" service October 2012.

The information booklet that will be provided to all residents when the new bins are dropped off can be found at:

http://www.winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/garbage/newCollection/guide_en.stm

Categories: Sustainability, Waste Removal

Dursban Spraying

Q: Dursban, Why are we using it?


 

 


 

·         It is currently the only effective product to use against Elm Bark Beetles that cause Dutch Elm Disease.


 

·         There are no viable, effective alternatives at this time.


 

·         Once a tree is treated and the product dries it is effective for two years against elm bark beetles.


 

 


 

 


 

Q: How it applied?


 

 


 

·     It is sprayed on the ground within 22 cm of the tree trunks.


 

·         Spray directly on the bottom 50 cm of the trunks of the tree.


 

·         There is little to no spray drift.


 

·         It is only being used by the Insect Control Branch as a direct spray on the base of elms trees where appropriate. (most jurisdictions in the US and any provinces that have a Dutch Elm disease program can use Dursban if they had access to product and licensed pesticide applicators)


 

 


 

Q: Is Dursban banned?


 

 


 

·         It is for some uses but not for all uses, registered usage is still permitted in US as well as other provinces until the end of 2014; it cannot be used within structures but can be used to treat a variety of insect pests outside of homes.


 

·         Dursban is only banned for application/use within houses, schools, apartments, etc (structures) for structural pest control.


 

 


 

Q: When is it safe to be near or on the sprayed area?


 

 


 

·         It is safe to be near the treated area at any time once product has dried. The only time there is any perceived risk is when its wet on the bottom 50cm’s of t he bark but the smell of the Dursban would normally keep all away from touching or eating the bark.


 

·         Notices would be present in public areas at the time of application to advise people of the products presence.


 

 


 

 


 

Q: How do I know what areas are to be sprayed?


 

 


 

·         A map is provided that includes where the City intends on spraying Dursban and is attached at


 


 

·         Sir John Franklin, J. B. Mitchel, Mathers, parts of Central and South River Heights http://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/bugline/New%20IMA%20Map/images/Area_30_Map.gif


 

·         Lindenwoods, Linden Ridge and Chevrier - http://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/bugline/New%20IMA%20Map/images/Area_24_Map.gif


 


 


 

·         Where it is being sprayed on private property (river properties) the residents receive notification.


 

·         Signage is placed on all boulevards, park entrances and anywhere possible where treatment has occurred. Signs remain up for most of the day and removed at the end of the shift. Signs have dated sprayed, product used and 311’s # on it for further information.


 

 


 

Q: Is City Council approval required?


 

 


 

·         Permission is granted for its registered use as a part of a Dutch Elm Disease management program and its proper urban use is identified on the label


 

·         Permission for use is from the Pesticide Use Permit issued to the Insect Control Branch by the Province of Manitoba, Conservation.


 

·         After 2014, the label/product is not being renewed and an alternative is not in sight at this time for the effective control of elm bark beetles.


 

 


 

Q: Notification how is the public notified?


 

 


 

· Official notification is done by the Insect Control Branch in the newspapers and on the website that the city would be using this product in that year http://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/bugline/news_releases/default.stm


 

·         Private, hand delivered notification are given to homes which back onto rivers where application will be done on private property.


 

·         Web site information is available @ http://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/bugline/dutch_elm/spraying.stm

Categories: Bugs, City Hall

Train Whistling Q&A

 

Recently there has been an increase in evening train whistling disturbing the residents of the Linden Woods, South River Heights, Mathers and Brockville Neighbourhoods (http://www.orlikow.ca/images/userfiles/Ward_Map.pdf) .


 

 


 

The following Q&A gives you a better understanding of why there is whistling, actions to stop it and what you can do to help.


 

 


 

Q: Why is there an increase in overnight Train Whistling?


 

 


 

A: The train whistling is a result of CNR delivery trains following federal train whistling regulations during scheduled deliveries.


 

 


 

Q: Can the City of Winnipeg prevent trains from whistling?


 

 


 

A: Depends - In order to have a ‘No Whistle’ crossing, the City must fulfill the appropriate safety requirements and send the corresponding documentation to the local railway company. It is then up to the rail company to apply for the ‘No Whistle’ sign with Transport Canada.


 

 


 

Q: What is a ‘No Whistle’ sign?


 

 


 

A ‘No Whistle’ sign informs a train crew that they need not whistle for the upcoming intersection. A train may still whistle if there is an obstruction on or near the railway, such as a pedestrian or an animal.


 

 


 

Q: Do the local crossings have ‘No Whistle’ signs?


 

 


 

A: All the crossings in the River Heights - Fort Garry Ward have “No Whistle” signs. The most recent sign went up at the Canadian Pacific Railway crossing at Sterling Lyon Parkway in spring 2012.


 

 


 

Q: Where are the train whistles coming from?


 

 


 

A: There are three railway crossings just west of Lindenwoods, within Paula Havixbeck’s Ward of Charleswood – Tuxedo.


 

 


 

CNR at Sterling Lyon


 

All the upgrades and requirements to make this crossing a ‘No Whistle’ crossing have been completed by the City. The City provided CNR the paperwork for them to submit to Transport Canada to approve the ‘No Whistle’ in 2010. CNR failed to file the paperwork with Transport Canada at that time. The City has since met with CNR urging them to re-initiate the ‘No Whistle’ process. We are presently awaiting confirmation that CNR has submitted the paperwork requirements to Transport Canada.


 

 


 

Lowson Spur Line


 

After discussing this issue of train whistling with Councillor Havixbeck, I understand that she has begun enquiries into upgrading this crossing.


 

 


 

Lindenwoods Drive West Crossing


 

The City has been informed by Transport Canada that it would not consider this crossing for ‘No Whistle’ at this time due to safety concerns about the configuration of the crossing and the nearby intersection.


 

 


 

Q: Is there any other way to cross a road without having to whistle?


 

 


 

A: Yes,  It is possible for a train to cross a ‘Whistle’ crossing without whistling. The process is known as the ‘Stop and Proceed’. 


 

 


 

My office is communicating with CNR to discuss this option.


 

 


 

My staff continues discussion with Member of Parliament Rod Bruinooge’s office as many issues are under Federal Jurisdiction.


 

 


 

Q: How is train noise governed?


 

 


 

A: Because trains cross the country and travel through many cities and municipalities, trains and train activity are under federal jurisdiction.


 

 


 

The cities take care of the roads that cross them, and work jointly with rail companies in working towards making crossings ‘safe’ as described by Transport Canada. Whenever we can do this it means that a crossing can be designated ‘No Whistle’, which results in less whistle blowing at that crossing.


 

 


 

Because activity on the rail property, like regulating train whistling, is under federal jurisdiction, your Member of Parliament is your representative who has authority over this area. The Member of Parliament for the Linden Woods area is Rod Bruinooge. The representative for the area to the north of Wilkes is Joyce Bateman. Their contact information is below:
 


Joyce Bateman

102-611 Corydon Avenue

Winnipeg Manitoba 

R3L-0P3            
           

Phone: 204-983-1355

Fax: 204-984-3979


Ottawa Office:

311 Justice Building

Ottawa Ontario K1A 0A6

Phone: 613-992-9475
 

 

Rod Bruinooge

2855 Pembina Highway, Unit 27
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3T 2H5

Phone: 204-984-6787

Fax: 204-984-6792


 

Ottawa Office:

House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A6
           
Phone: 613-995-7517
             

 

 

 
You can also contact the rail companies directly:

 

CNR customer service is (613) 562-9732 during regular business hours.

 

CPR customer service is (403) 319-7000;

·         Choose your language of preference,

·         Choose option 7 for the Community Connect line

 

Q: What has your office done to stop the whistling?

 

·         All intersections in the River Heights/Ft. Garry Ward have been upgraded to No-whistle

·         Working with Rod Bruinooge’s office to supply possible resolutions to this problem. This includes the ‘Stop and Proceed’ procedure, and/or locating and asking for a rescheduling of train deliveries to daytime hours.

·         Working with Councillor Havixbeck regarding nearby crossings in the Charleswood – Tuxedo Ward to work with her towards resolving this issue.

·         Providing information and support to residents to lobby for change.

Categories: City Hall

Q: What is in the Silos along Lindsay St.?

A: The silos contain a Magnesium Chloride Aqueous Solution. This solution is used as part of the application used for dust retardant and other applications.

 
The material data safety sheet scores the substance a:
-          1 on Health concerns, slight
-          has a rating of 0 on Physical Hazard and Flammability and
-          is rated “G” on Personal Protection, which is very general personal protection, wear gloves and eye protection stuff.
 
The requirements associated with spill cleanup are:
-          Absorb the liquid and dispose of in labeled container for disposal under Provincial Federal guidelines, water down what is left.
 
The material data safety sheet is attached for your review.

Categories: Development, Public Safety

Q: Does Councillor Orlikow want the Silos removed?

A:  Yes, The storage silos along Lindsay need to be removed and the City is working towards gaining the legal position to do so.

Categories: Development

Who do I call in case of an Environmental Emergency?

Province of Manitoba

Call 1-204-944-4888
24 hours
 
An environmental emergency is any release or imminent release of a contaminant that may pose a risk to public health or the environment.
 
When reporting an environmental emergency, please provide as much information as possible, including:
your name and phone number
exact location of the emergency
type of emergency (spill, leak, fire, overturn, derailment, etc.)
name and spelling of the product(s) involved, if known
estimate of the amount of the product(s) (released or still in containment)
 
A member of the Manitoba Environmental Emergency Response Team will contact you immediately with information about emergency procedures and the potential dangers associated with the product(s) involved. On-site assistance will be provided as necessary.

images/userfiles/Emergency Contact Info re spill - Copy.pdf

Categories: Public Safety

What are some Neighbourhood Crime Prevention Options?

There are a number of options however the best place to start is to contact the Citizen's Action Network. Information on this program and other programs are listed below.

Citizen's Action Network Provides Neighbourhood Safety Solutions @ http://www.orlikow.ca/news/view/547

 

COPP through MPI @ http://www.orlikow.ca/faqs/142 

 

Neighbourhood Watch @ http://www.orlikow.ca/news/view/550

 

Citizens For Crime Awareness @ http://www.orlikow.ca/news/view/548

 

Block Parent Program @ http://www.orlikow.ca/news/view/549

·         Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/Block-Parent-Program-of-Winnipeg/1544558082453638

·         On Winnipeg Police Services http://www.winnipeg.ca/police//TakeAction/block_parents.stm

 

Categories: Public Safety

How to drive a Traffic Circle

  1. Slow your speed as you approach the intersection.
  2. Stop in advance of the sidewalk if pedestrians are crossing.
  3. Yield to vehicles that arrive first at the intersection.
    Yield to vehicles on the right if arriving at the same time.
  4. Keep to the right and travel around the traffic circle in a counterclockwise direction.

 


How to drive a Traffic Circle 

Categories: Alternative transportation, By-laws, Infrastructure, Roads, Traffic

How do Cyclist Travel Through Traffic Circles?

Cyclists must travel through the traffic circle in a counter-clockwise direction, entering and exiting the circle on the right.

A cyclist or motorist already in the circle has the right of way. If a cyclist and motorist arrive at the same time, the vehicle to the right has the right of way (similar to a four way stop).

How to cycle through a traffic circle

  1. Safely merge from the bike lane into the traffic lane before entering traffic circle.
  2. Watch for pedestrians. Be prepared to stop in advance of the sidewalk if pedestrians are crossing.
  3. Yield to circulating traffic already in the intersection, on your left.
  4. If arriving at the intersection at the same time, yield to vehicles and cyclist  on the right, allowing them to enter the intersection first.
  5. When clear, enter and keep to the right of the center island and travel around the traffic circle in a counter-clockwise direction.
  6. Upon reaching your exit street, signal a right turn. Watch for pedestrians as you exit.
  7. Return to the bike lane.

How to drive a traffic circle

Since these traffic circles are a single lane in width, cyclist need to adjust their position closer to the center of the lane before the traffic circle and holding that position as you travel through.

Once you exit, return immediately to the most practicable position on the road.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Traffic

Answers to August 16th Public Meeting regarding the Barricade at Harrow and Academy.

On August 16th, 2012, I met with a number of residents to discuss the purpose, side-effects, and any suggestions to the Harrow barricade at Academy Road.

I was asked a number of questions, which I have provided answers to below:

Why does Harrow have a barricade?
 
The barricade was placed as part of the City of Winnipeg Active Transportation network (insert link) and includes a traffic light, to make the Harrow/ Academy intersection safer for bicycle and pedestrian crossing, while not allowing for an increase in vehicle traffic to and from Wellington.
 
The traffic light was placed to allow safer crossing along Harrow at Academy Road. It connects the Harrow Active Transportation Corridor from Wellington Crescent to Pembina Hwy, and crosses the other Active Transportation Corridors at Grosvenor and Warsaw.
 
Providing a four-way light at Harrow would have provided access via Harrow St. to and from Wellington Crs.
 
The results would be making
-          Increase vehicle traffic along Harrow and Wellington Crs as a  through route for people going and coming from downtown.
-          Harrow from Academy to Wellington Crs would be a lineup of cars waiting to cross Academy Rd in the morning, and a lineup of cars along Kelvin High School to cross over Academy to Wellington Crs going home.
-          Increasing the amount of cars speeding along Wellington Crs
-          Provide a less safe crossing point for cyclist and pedestrians to cross Academy Rd. to the Wellington Crs paths.
 
Before the barricade vehicle cut-through traffic originating at the Maryland Bridge would travel through Wellington and on to Harrow, as an alternative to Academy and Stafford which has more traffic lights.
 
Additional vehicle cut-through traffic originating from the east would travel through Wellington and on to Harrow, as an alternative to Academy to Stafford, which has more traffic lights.
 
Traffic counts along Harrow Street before the barricade were at 350 vehicles per day to the north of Academy, and 5500 vehicles per day to the south of Academy. The four-way light would have dramatically increased the traffic along Harrow, a non-regional street, to the north and south of Academy.
 
The barricade provides the safe crossing for bicyclists and pedestrians, while not increasing this vehicle traffic.
 
Did Council vote to have the barricade put up?
 
There was no council vote for the Harrow barricade. The barricade was a part of the 2009 Active Transportation Stimulus plan, which was a plan to design and construct a network of active transportation paths where they are most needed across the City of Winnipeg. 
 
The City contributed one third of the cost, with the province and federal government paying the other two thirds.
 
The plan to fund an Active Transportation Stimulus Plan was adopted by Council on December 15th, 2009 as part of the 2010 Capital Budget. The infrastructure changes along the proposed routes were managed by the Public Works department with public input into the designs.
 
Were public consultations held before the Harrow barricade was constructed?
 
The coordinating consultant for the 2009 Active Transportation Stimulus Plan held public consultation events for input and feedback on the proposed changes for the Harrow, Grosvenor, Fleet, and Warsaw. The details are below:
 
January 30, 2010 - Earl Grey Community Centre
 
·         Promoted through Free Press and community newspaper ads
·         Colour posters along the routes and nearby commercial corridors
·         Listed on the Winnipeg Active Transportation website
 
February 24, 2010 - Earl Grey Community Centre
 
·         Promoted through the Free Press
·         Colour posters along the routes and nearby commercial corridors
·         Letters hand-delivered to all households and businesses directly adjacent to the proposed routes
·         Letter and package hand delivered to all local schools
·         Emails to residents from first consultations
·         Mall promotions
 
April 12, 2010 – Kelvin High School
 
§ Local Residents received invitations from the City of Winnipeg to an information session regarding the Barricade.
 
Were the Public Consultations Adequate?
 
I believe the public consultations fell short of what was required. As such, I took initiative in sending out post cards to all residents north of the CPR tracks in February 2010, notifying residents of the proposed changes, inviting them to attend the public consultations, and inviting any feedback or suggestions they may have. Additionally I sent out emails to as many residents and community leaders I could reach, provided neighbourhood updates on my website, and encouraged residents to sign up to my email updates on the issue.
 
Why was Harrow chosen as a bike path route?
 
The city conducted a bicycle route study in 2009, which showed that both Harrow and Stafford combined were one of the highest used bicycle routes in the city. The counts were consistent with the counts of the local bicycle lobbyist organization, Bike to the Future. Harrow was chosen as an Active Transportation Corridor because it’s a safer alternative to Stafford. Also, fewer bikes on Stafford would improve traffic flow along Stafford.
 
Have more bicyclists been using Harrow?
 
The city doesn’t have current bike counts for cyclists using Harrow to/from Wellington, although Bike to the Future counted bicyclists traveling along Harrow crossing Grosvenor. During the 2011-2012 counts, there was an increase of 136% in bicycles using Harrow at Grosvenor.
 
Were alternatives to the barricade considered?
 
The other choices reviewed by the department included crossing lights and pedestrians corridors but were considered as unsafe alternatives.
I met with a number of local residents in late 2010 to discuss suggestions regarding the Harrow barricade. Residents came up with an alternative design allowing westbound Academy traffic to access northbound Harrow, and allowing southbound traffic along Harrow to turn right onto westbound Academy. This option was designed to not allow for northbound Harrow traffic to cross the Academy intersection. The department reviewed the request and denied it in January 2011. The department stated these turns “would be contrary to the intent of having refuge areas for cyclists as they proceed across Academy Road. Allowing the turn movements would place the cyclists in conflict with turning vehicles.” In other words, the vehicles would need to drive over top of the bike lanes in order to make these turns.
 
I met again with local residents on September 16, 2012 and another alternative was presented by some community members which allowed traffic to go west bound onto Academy from Harrow. This alternative was denied by department for the same reasons as stated above.
 
What is the impact of the barricade on local residents?
 
Since the barricade has been put up, some local residents have expressed concerns about increased traffic in the lane between Guelph and Harrow, increased traffic along Guelph Street north of Harrow, exiting onto Academy from Guelph, accessing their properties and difficulty with parking along Harrow. :
 
What has been done about the increase in back lane traffic between Harrow and Guelph?
 
Once the barricade came in, a number of drivers began using the lane adjacent to Academy connecting Harrow and Guelph to go onto Harrow and then onto Wellington Crescent. Drivers also turned from Wellington onto Harrow, and down the lane to Guelph. While traffic counts were relatively high at first, a number of things were done to decrease the traffic volume.
 
·         In June of 2011 and 2012 my office notified the local churches at the corner of Wellington and Academy of upcoming Sunday road closures and appropriate traffic routes for parishioners to use during Sunday closures.
·         In June 2011, my office asked the city’s traffic control unit to ensure that clear passage is made along Wellington to allow vehicles to travel along northbound Guelph to eastbound Wellington Crescent. I ensured this passage has continuously been maintained.
·         I requested that on Sundays ‘Local Access Only’ signs be installed along east and westbound Wellington for summer and fall 2011, and again 2012.
·         I arranged for an additional “Local Access Only” signs to be placed at the intersection of Wellington Crs and Academy, facing incoming traffic, to remind them of the closure and divert them away from Wellington Crs. and towards Academy before they arrived at Harrow and Wellington Crs. and the Sunday road closure signs.
·         I requested a traffic volume and speed study, which measured two full weeks of traffic between Sept 17 and Sept 30, 2011 along the back lane. The average daily counts were 113 vehicles per weekday, and 125 vehicles per weekend day. The city concluded this is below the expected normal volume of 9.8 vehicle trips per day per household (totaling 130 trips along Harrow per day). The majority of vehicles were below the 30 km per hour speed limit with the average speed being 21 km per hour and the 85th percentile being 29 km per hour.
·         Speed humps were not installed along this lane because the speed study showed the percentage of speeders was too low to meet the city warrant criteria for speed humps.
 
Can anything be done about the increase in traffic on Guelph?
 
I have asked the department to do a traffic study and provide options to address this traffic.
 
Has anything been done about the parking on Harrow north of Academy?
 
Because the lack of motor vehicle traffic now makes this section of Harrow safer for cyclists, I requested that the parking be re-instated along Harrow, despite the bike lanes. The department re-instated parking along the west side of Harrow in December 2010. In July 2011, the department decided not to allow parking because it would encourage further traffic to use the lane between Harrow and Guelph. I also requested that this portion of Harrow be no longer designated as a no-parking snow route during the winter months. The criteria was reviewed and a decision will be made by the department shortly.
 
Is the barricade safe?
 
The barricade, with the traffic lights, allows pedestrians and cyclists to easily cross Academy with reduced conflict with motor vehicles. This intersection had dangerous crossing beforehand. While Sunday traffic has increased along the lane, I ensured a dead-end sign was installed in 2011, and have worked with the local churches to ensure visitors have received information about alternative routes. I will continue to work with residents to ensure side effects do not pose a safety hazard.
 
Can the crossing time at the Harrow light be increased?
 
The current light crossing time is approximately five seconds of green light time. The department chose this timing because they do not want to promote traffic on Harrow as an alternative to Stafford. The department noted this is sufficient time for several vehicles to get through and for most people to get across. Longer time would encourage more drivers to use Harrow as an alternative to Stafford.
 
I discussed the crossing time at this light with the department in July 2011, five months after the installation of the traffic counts. At that time 311 had not yet received a request for an increase in crossing time at this intersection. The department advises that this light provides more than sufficient crossing time at the average walking speed. Should you have any reason to request an increased in crossing time, I will be happy to ask the department to review it.
 
Can a park with trees be placed on Harrow instead of a barricade?
 
Possibly. This would likely further reduce the potential of vehicles making illegal turns, and replace the barricade with a beautified landscape. However, at this point, local residents continue to bring suggestions for changes or removal of the barricade. A park should only be considered if there is plenty of agreement amongst the community that this should be done.
 
Can the Harrow traffic light be put on Wellington Crs instead?
 
No. Wellington Crescent at Harrow is an intersection of two residential streets within a residential neighbourhood. The more logical location is the intersection of Harrow and Academy. Wellington Crescent is widely used as a leisure route, open to pedestrians and cyclists during Sunday closures. A traffic light would have a significant negative impact to the beauty of this street.
 
Could a photo radar camera enforce traffic movements, reducing the need for a barricade?
 
A photo radar camera can only monitor traffic – it cannot enforce it.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Roads, Traffic

How do I get involved in enhancing a park?

There are many residents that want to take part in enhancing and preserving the quality of their local park and neighborhood.

The City of Winnipeg is here to help.

For more information go to: http://www.winnipeg.ca/publicworks/ParksAndFields/Parks/AdoptAPark.asp

Categories: Green Space

My car was improperly ticketed and/or towed during street cleaning what can I do?

Q: Can I ask for a review of the ticket?

Q: What if I want to challenge the ticket?
A: If you would like to challenge your ticket using the court process you may contest the ticket by appearing at Provincial Court. Before you do, you must have your ticket reviewed by the Winnipeg Parking Authority. You can do this with the on line process noted above, in person, through 311 or at 311@Winnipeg.ca.
Once this is done, you may file a plea of Not Guilty, or Guilty with an Explanation with Provincial Court, and your case will be heard by a magistrate or Judge.
Q: Where can I get information about parking regulations?

Categories: By-laws, City Hall

How are Developments Communicated to the Public

 

Requirements for public notice (posting) are outlined in both the City of Winnipeg Charter and the City of Winnipeg Development Procedures By-law:
 
Board of Adjustment - Variances / Conditional Uses
·         posted on site a minimum 14 days prior to the public hearing
 
Community Committee - Rezonings / Zoning Agreement Amendments / Secondary Plan By-laws / etc.
·         posted on site a minimum 14 days prior to the public hearing and,
·         advertise in two newspapers minimum 14 days before the public hearing
 
The information on DMIS is typically published the Thursday before the Public Hearing. http://winnipeg.ca/clkdmis/
 
The City is required to send those registered at a public hearing a letter regarding the decision made and if there is an appeal hearing date, however the City not required to mail out letters to give notice of an upcoming public hearing.
 
Public Open Houses / Public Consultation by a Developer is optional however we often recommend it for large scale projects.

Please let us know if you have suggestions on how communication can be improved and our office will continue advocate for improvements.

Categories: By-laws, City Hall, Development

Neighbourhood Compatibility - 2012 Montrose Housing

Neighbourhood Compatibility

Large houses have recently been built in the neighbourhood including one on Montrose Street in River Heights. The houses towers over the next door houses and is set farther forward than most houses on the block.
 
I held a meeting on September 5, 2012 to discuss in-fill houses, answer questions, and to hear what the neighbourhood had to say.
 
I have since prepared a motion concerning this issue and continue to work on your behalf. Please view the Q&A below in response to questions heard at the meeting.
 
Q: Is the city councillor notified when plans are submitted for a new home?
 
Yes and No, plans are submitted to Community Committee for approval only as long as the home does not require a variance, which is a modification of a provision of a zoning by-law, or a re-zoning or subdivision. 
 
If the home complies with existing zoning the councillor is not notified of plans for a home.
 
Q: Why could I not see these plans before the house was approved?
 
So long as a property-owner complies with the City of Winnipeg Zoning By-law, the plans for the property are protected by privacy legislation.
 
Q: What is been done so similarly large home are in context with the neighbourhood?
 
The issue of the set back that allowed a house on Montrose Ave to be built closer to the sidewalk than others on the block has been dealt with through a motion requiring the if two set backs are permitted the one that matches the existing houses will be used.
 
The other issue of height and masses of homes relative to the neighbours homes is part of the over-all by-law review presently been conducted by the City of Winnipeg.
 
 
Q: The distance of the new home on Montrose was a distance of 3 feet from the edge of the yard. How is this possible without a variance?
 
A residential single-family detached home zoned as large or medium, such as the zoning on Montrose, must have a side yard setback minimum of 4 feet. However, various projections are allowed that may extend to 1 or 2 feet form the property line, depending on the projection.
 
Q: Could we set up design guidelines for the neighbourhood?
 
There are a number of options to help influence in-fill homes including Plan Development Over-lays and design guidelines and ensuring the Zoning By-law is adjusted appropriately to allow some flexibility while ensuring homes are somewhat consistent with the character of the neighbourhood. All these approaches are in the process of review.
 
Q: What can we do to aide John to ensure this doesn’t happen again?
 
I am always open to hearing new suggestions for improvements in the neighbourhood and the city. Public support at committee and council meetings gives weight to issues discussed on the agenda. You can also talk to other councillors, or residents of other wards, to make our council decision-making a more engaging and collaborative process.
 
 
 

Categories: By-laws, City Hall

Why are All-way stop control signs not used as a speed control device?

Many requests received for additional stop signs are related to concerns of speeding. 

Studies show that stop signs only influence motorists to slow down within approximately 30 metres before and after the stop sign and that speeds actually increase at mid-block locations to the original speeds and often higher as drivers attempt to make up for lost time. 

All-way stop control does not reduce traffic volumes. Before and after studies show that stop signs have little or no impact on vehicular volume.
 
Unwarranted stop signs result in unacceptable levels of stop sign non-compliance and breeds disrespect for all traffic signs.
 
Stop sign compliance studies show that when all-way stop control was installed but not warranted, an average of 68% to 95% of the motorists approaching the intersection do not come to a complete stop. In general, if people see no reason for the stop sign, they disrespect the sign.
 
Excessive unwarranted stop sign usage breeds disrespect for all traffic signs.  Inappropriate signs become part of the landscape and their effectiveness is reduced.
 
All-way stop control does not always increase safety or reduce collisions at an intersection. Disregard and disrespect of stop signs by the motorist may decrease safety. 
 
Pedestrians may be lured into a false sense of security by the presence of a stop sign by assuming that motorists will stop.
 
Young children who are raised to believe that people obey laws are the most vulnerable victims.
 
Other motorists may also assume a motorist will stop because of the presence of the sign and enter the intersection when it is not safe to do so, thus resulting in the potential for a collision. 
 
All-way stop control may reduce the number of right-angle and left with opposing through collisions.  However, there is a potential increase in the number of rear-end and fixed object collisions, especially if there is a high volume of traffic being required to stop unnecessarily. 
               
Unwarranted stop signs result in an increase of noise and air pollution and fuel consumption.  Residents living nearest the intersection experience an increase in traffic noise resulting from vehicles stopping and accelerating (tire noise and engine noise).  Stopping and accelerating also increases environmental emissions and fuel consumption.
 
The purpose of all-way stop control (3-way or 4-way) is to assign right-of-way to traffic approaching an intersection. Stop signs should only be used where an engineering analysis indicates the usage of stop signs is warranted.  The following aspects are considered:
 
•             Traffic Volume – All-way stop control may be recommended where there are large traffic volumes (vehicles and pedestrians) approaching the intersection from all directions and the volume of traffic approaching from each street is close to being equal.
 
•             Collision History – All-way stop control may be recommended where there is a high incidence of right angle and/or left with opposing through collisions.
 

Categories: Roads, Traffic

Answers to Questions raised by Beaumont and Maybank residents related to 2nd leg of rapid transit

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q:        Through traffic: How will traffic going to and from the Rapid Transit line access the line from Pembina and Waverley?

A:         Functional Design and service planning for Stage 2 of the Southwest Transitway has not yet been completed but options to minimize any impact on the neighbourhood will be of great importance.
 
Q:        Protecting Green Space: Will the line go through forest or the line of trees that run along Parker?
 
A:         The impact of Stage 2 of the Transitway on the tree areas along Parker will be better understood with the completion of the Functional Design Study for late 2013 or early 2014.   Retaining the value of the green space remains a high priority. 
 
Q:        Noise: What type of noise can the neighbourhood expect and what measures are been recommended to minimize any noise?
 
A:         One can get a very good sense of the noise associated with the Transitway by standing on the AT path alongside of Stage 1 of the Southwest Transitway.
  
Q:        Active Transportation: Will there be an active transportation path built with the Rapid Transit Line?
 
A:         Although details around the development of AT facilities will be better defined during Functional Design, the intent is to support Stage 2 of the Transitway with AT improvements.
 
Q:        Dog Park: Will the Rapid Transit line impact the Brenda Leipsic Dog Park?
 
A:         As with the Green Space questions, the impact of Stage 2 of the Transitway on the area will be better understood with the completion of the Functional Design Study in approximately 12 months’ time.
The retention of Leipsic Dog park, as with retention of green space, remains a priority.  
 
Q:        Safety:            Are there any safety concerns associated with having rapid transportation run alongside an existing neighbourhood?
 
A:         Similar to Stage 1, construction of the corridor will be sited near to existing and proposed residential developments in an effort to maximize the value of the service.  Although construction of the Transitway presents risks similar to any other roadway, it is important to note that transit vehicles utilizing the corridor will be operated by professional drivers. 
 
Q:        Potential Expropriation: Are homes going to be expropriated?
 
A:         The potential for some expropriation of properties does exist.  The details of these expropriations will be better understood following Functional Design. 
 
Q:        Residential Access to the Neighbourhood: Are any of the present road access points into the neighbourhood going to be closed off? 
 
A:         The potential for the closure, or relocation, of some road access points does exist, particularly with Hurst Way.  Again, the details surrounding this issue will be better understood following Functional Design.
 

Categories: Development, Transit

What do I do if I am having trouble getting my recycling and waste bins out for pick up

 

 

 

There is a service, provided at no additional cost to you, that has collectors walking up to your home, empty and return any recycling and garbage containers.

for more additional information go to:

http://winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/garbage/walk-upService.stm

 

Categories: Waste Removal

Questions regarding McGillivray Village Proposal

I have been asked to respond to a resident’s questions regarding my opinion related to the rezoning process that is being considered for McGillivray Village - the site located between the MTS building on Waverley St. and Tangle Ridge Crs. off McGillivray Blvd - and specific concerns raised about:

 
-          public access,
-          traffic barrier on Falcon Ridge,
-          and commercial zoning designation
 
The first question asked was how to ensure Inlett’s proposal, presented at the open house, to close public access onto Powder Ridge and that road access to Falcon Ridge will have a knock down barrier that restricts the traffic to emergency vehicles only, does happen.
 
This issue will be considered at the public hearing after input from various City of Winnipeg Departments and from the community. 
 
A requirement to have the design plans come back to the City Centre Committee before building starts ensures that what is approved at the public hearing happens.
 
The amount of available parking was raised and possible alternatives can be presented at the public hearing however it is advised to contact the developer prior to the public meeting with suggestions. 
 
In reply to the question related to what type of zoning designation will reply, the Planning Department informed me that zoning will be predetermined and advertised based upon the density and land uses that are proposed. 
 
The question of what kind of businesses can occupy the commercial space, based on zoning, is determined at the public hearing however limiting commercial uses is possible through the public hearing.
 
It is important that the neighbourhood engages in the public hearing process to let me know if they support or do not support the project and why.  The best infill projects come from the neighbourhood and the developer working together.
 
The date of the public hearing will be posted but has yet to be determined.   We will let the neighbourhood know when the meeting is scheduled.   
 
Let me know if you have any concerns or questions as I can discuss the project freely until a formal application is made.  Afterwards, all information I receive and comments on development projects must be done publically therefore my ability to comment is limited to process questions only.
 

Categories: Development

South West Rapid Transit

The questions below were asked by residents and the responses are from the Department.

These non-answers cloud the ability to ensure the best route is chosen and are needed to answered before a route is chosen.

Parker Rapid Transit Questions and Replies

Through traffic

Q: How will traffic going to and from the Rapid Transit line access the line from Pembina and Waverley?
 
Although Functional Design and service planning for Stage 2 of the Southwest Transitway has not yet been completed, access to the Corridor could potentially occur at Pembina and Jubilee, at Hurst/Beaumont, at McGillivray, at Bishop Grandin, at Markham, and/or at Bison.
 
Protecting Green Space
 
Q: Will the line go through forest or the line of trees that run along Parker?
 
A:  The impact of Stage 2 of the Transitway on the tree areas along Parker will be better understood with the completion of the Functional Design Study in approximately 12 months’ time.
 
Noise
Q:  What type of noise can the neighbourhood expect and what measures are been recommended to minimize any noise?
 
A:  One can get a very good sense of the noise associated with the Transitway by standing on the AT path alongside of Stage 1 of the Southwest Transitway. Many people find that the operation of buses along the Corridor is surprising quiet, and in fact, very few noise complaints have been received since operation of Stage 1 began in April.
 
 Active Transportation
 
Q: Will there be an active transportation path built with the Rapid Transit Line?
 
A:  Although details around the development of AT facilities will be better defined during Functional Design, the intent is to support Stage 2 of the Transitway with AT improvements.
 
Dog Park
Q: Will the Rapid Transit line impact the Brenda Leipsic Dog Park?
 
A:  As with the Green Space questions, the impact of Stage 2 of the Transitway on the area will be better understood with the completion of the Functional Design Study in approximately 12 months’ time.
 
Safety
 
Q:  Are there any safety concerns associated with having rapid transportation run alongside an existing neighbourhood?
 
A:  Similar to Stage 1, construction of the corridor will be sited near to existing and proposed residential developments in an effort to maximize the value of the service.  Although construction of the Transitway presents risks similar to any other roadway, it is important to note that transit vehicles utilizing the corridor will be operated by professional drivers.
 
Potential Expropriation
 
Q: Are homes going to be expropriated?
 
A:  The potential for some expropriation of properties does exist.  The details of these expropriations will be better understood following Functional Design.
 
Residential Access to the Neighbourhood
 
Q:  Are any of the present road access points into the neighbourhood going to be closed off?
 
A:  The potential for the closure, or relocation, of some road access points does exist, particularly with Hurst Way.  Again, the details surrounding this issue will be better understood following Functional Design.
As for the posting of the findings of the Stage 2 Southwest Transitway Alignment Study – we expect to have the report (and the maps in the report) posted to our website shortly.
 
For more information on the project go to:

Categories: Green Space, Infrastructure, Roads, Sustainability, Traffic, Transit

Block Party Q & A

Q: Do I need a permit to have a block Party?

All Block Parties require street closure permits. Streets cannot be closed partially; the closure must be the full width of the street and between intersections.
Q: How do I apply for a Permit?
Applications must be received 7 days in advance of the event and accompanied by a 70% majority petition of all affected property owners.
A General Liability insurance policy in the amount of $2,000,000.00 is required, adding the City of Winnipeg as an additional named insured. Usually, homeowners come onto the City's rider for a fee (currently $133.00). This insurance has a $2,500.00 deductible per incident, to be borne by the applicant and does not cover carnival rides, fireworks or the sale of liquor.
Q: Who picks up and delivers the barricades?
Barricades required must be picked up by applicant and a deposit left with our Department. The deposit is refunded when barricades are returned by applicant.
Q: How do I contact permits for more info?
For more information, please call 204-986-6006.
Q: Can I get assistance to cover the cost of the permit?
Our office supports Block Parties as an excellent means of community building therefore our office will cover the cost of the permit.
This community grant that can be applied for to pay for permits but you need to apply through our office at least one month ahead of the event. 
Grants are awarded on a first come first serve basis.

Categories: Community Centres, Public Safety

2014 General Assessment Roll Certified

June 11, 2013, The 2014 General Assessment roll is certified and the formal Notices have been mailed. 

Property owners should expect to receive the Notice within the next couple of days. 
 
Please find below some general information with respect to the 2014 General Assessment.  
 
Q:           What is the Reference Date?  
 
 
A:            The 2014 General Assessment is based on a reference date of April 1, 2012.  This means that the values we have produced for the 2014 General Assessment are based on the value as if the property were sold on April 1, 2012.  The 2014 values update existing values which were based on a April 1, 2010 reference date. 
 
Q:           What was the average assessment increase?
 
A:            The average city-wide assessment increase for all properties is about 12%.
While this is the average increase, the real estate market will have affected each property differently, with some properties increasing in value above, at or below the 12% city-wide average.
 
Q:           When will I be taxed based on this value?
 
A:            The 2014 General Assessment roll will not be used for taxation purposes until 2014.  But as in past General Assessments, the formal notices are issued well in advance of tax bills being created based on those values.
 
Q:           What will my taxes be based on this new assessment?
 
A:            The 2014 assessments will not be used for taxation purposes until the 2014 tax year.  This is when City Council, the various school divisions, and the Province of Manitoba (Education Support Levy) set their various budgets and resulting tax rates are calculated.
However, It is important to remember that an increase in the market value of a specific property does not necessarily result in a proportionate increase in the level of property taxes.
 
Q:           What if I disagree with this value?
 
A:            Property owners may file an appeal with the Board of Revision.  The deadline for filing an appeal is June 27, 2013. 
 
Q:           Where can property owners obtain additional information?
 
A:            Additional information on the 2014 General Assessment can be found at:
 
Additional information on filing an appeal can be found at the Board of Revision web site:

Categories: Taxes and Fees

Summer Wading Pool Hours - River Heights and Linden Woods

 

Q: Where and What Time are Wading Pools Open in River Heights?

A: Wading pools in River Heights and Linden Woods are at the following locations:

Brock Cordova : 372 Cordova                      Monday - Sunday 10:30 – 7:00pm

Crescentwood CC: 1170 Corydon                Monday - Friday 11:00 – 5:30 pm

Harrow Park: 1000 Fleet                               Monday - Saturday 11:00 – 5:30 pm

Montrose Park: 631 Montrose                     Monday – Friday 11:00 – 5:30 pm

Sir John Franklin CC: 1 Sir John Franklin     Thursday – Friday 11:00 – 5:30 pm

TR Hodgson: 303 Lockwood                                     Wednesday – Friday 11:00 – 5:30 pm

William Osler: 787 Brock                               Monday - Wednesday 11:00 – 5:00 pm

River Heights Spray Pad: 1370 Grosvenor Ave Monday – Sunday 10:00 - 7:00pm

Lindenwoods Spray Pad: 414 Lindenwoods Dr. W Monday – Sunday 10:00 - 7:00pm

Operating schedules are subject to change. For the most current schedule information visit the City of Winnipeg Web site at www.winnipeg.ca or call 311 for additional information.

Q: When Causes Wading Pool Closures?

A: All wading pools are closed on days when Environment Canada forecasts either the projected high temperature for the day is 21°C or lower or the probably of precipitation is 70% or greater. For more information go to: http://www.winnipeg.ca/cms/recreation/facilities/pools/wading_pools/wadingpoolrules.stm#closure

Wading Pools may need to close unexpectedly - please check for more information.

Go to: http://www.winnipeg.ca/cms/recreation/facilities/pools/wading_pools/wadingpools.stm after 10:30 am for the most current wading pool information.

Please note: Each pool closes one hour earlier on its last operating day of the season.

Categories: City Hall, Community Centres

Discoloured Water

 

 

Q: Why is my water dirty or discoloured?


 

A: Your dirty or discoloured water probably results from a change in the rate of flow of water in the system. This can cause sediment in the water pipes to loosen and be released into the water. The rate of flow may vary due to water main breaks, firefighting, water main cleaning, or increased water use during hot weather.


 

 


 

Q: What causes dirty or discoloured water?


 

A: Shoal Lake, our water source since 1919, contains algae, sediment and minerals which occur naturally in lake water. Before our new drinking water treatment plant started operating in December 2009, the material would settle on the bottom of the water pipes in the distribution system and form a lining inside the pipes. Although the drinking water treatment plant removes algae and sediment from the water, the buildup is still present in the water pipes. Whenever there is a change in the flow of water, the deposits may be disturbed, resulting in dirty or discoloured water.


 

 


 

Q: Why am I getting discoloured water on more than one occasion?


 

A: You are more likely to get discoloured water in the summer due to the higher demands on the water distribution system at peak times and the higher temperature of the water. Summer water use is higher than winter water use, due to warm weather and seasonal activities, such as:


 

·         residential use in refilling pools, and watering gardens, flower beds and lawns,


 

·         the use of fire hydrants for construction and landscaping, and


 

·         installation of new water pipe.


 

 


 

Q: What are you doing to address discoloured water?


 

A: We are taking every measure possible, including:


 

·         minimizing operations which might change the flow of water in the water distribution system (e.g., operating valves),


 

·         cleaning a section of the city’s water mains every year to preserve the high quality of water and remove the buildup of deposits and sediment in our water pipes,


 

·         continuing our extensive water quality monitoring and testing program,


 

·         reviewing the chemistry of the water,


 

·         looking for possible large unknown water leaks,


 

·         identifying unauthorized water use, and


 

·         arranging for an analysis of sections of water pipes.
 


 

Water Quality


 

 


 

Q: Is discoloured water safe?


 

A: Winnipeg’s water is tested each step of the way, from Shoal Lake to the tap, to ensure safe, high-quality drinking water. Drinking discoloured water should not make you sick, even if it does not smell, taste, or look pleasant. Although the discoloured water is not aesthetically pleasing, Winnipeg’s testing program shows that the water is safe. Our water continues to comply with the Operating Licence issued by the Provincial Office of Drinking Water, with Manitoba regulations, and with Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality.


 

 


 

Q: What should I do if my water is discoloured?


 

A: We recommend that you not use discoloured water for any purposes that require clean water, such as preparing food and beverages, or laundry. If your water is discoloured:


 

·         Turn on a cold water tap and let the water run for a few minutes. It is best to use a bathtub tap as there is no screen to catch any sediment. You can collect this water and use it to water your plants.


 

·         Catch some water in a light-coloured cup. If the water isn’t clear, wait 30 minutes and try again. Discoloured water usually doesn't last long. If your water still isn't clear after two to three hours, contact 311.


 

 


 

Q: What action do you take when I contact 311 and report discoloured water?


 

A: We will look at our operations to see if there is an explanation for the discoloured water in your neighbourhood (e.g., water main break). If there is a high number of reports of discoloured water in a neighbourhood, we will flush the water mains in the area (i.e., open the fire hydrants and drain the water into the street). This will usually solve the problem.


 

 


 

Billing


 

 


 

Q: Can I get reimbursed for running my tap to clear the discoloured water?


 

A: No, because the cost is low and the discoloured water can be used for other purposes (e.g., watering plants or the lawn). A typical residential tap running for 10 minutes will use approximately 60 - 80 litres of water. This will add 21-28 cents to the utility bill. The water is usually clear after running the tap for a few minutes.


 

 


 

More information


 

 


 

For more information on Winnipeg’s drinking water:


 

·         visit our website at winnipeg.ca/waterandwaste/water


 

·         contact our 311 Centre, open 24 hours every day, by email at 311@winnipeg.ca or by phone at 311


 

 

Categories: City Hall

2013 Sewage Treatment Program Update

What will the upgrades do?

·        The planned upgrades to the west end, south end, and north end sewage treatment plants are designed to reduce nutrient (phosphorus and nitrogen) contributions and meet environment act licence requirements from the Province of Manitoba.

Status – West End Sewage Treatment Plant

·        Biological nutrient removal (BNR) upgrade to reduce phosphorus and nitrogen contributions completed in 2008 at a cost of $33M.

Status – South End Sewage Treatment Plant

·        The approved 2013 capital budget (including the 5 year forecast – 2014-2018) for the upgrade is $272.75M.


·        In September 2011, the City of Winnipeg submitted a plan for upgrading the plant.

·        The Province approved the plan on April 18, 2012.

·        In April 2013, the City of Winnipeg assigned Professional Consulting Services for Upgrading/Expansion project at a contract cost of $25,350,419.00.


·        The City has been consistently working to execute our plan for the upgrades.

·        The project is proceeding in accordance with our submitted and approved plan and is estimated to be completed in October 2016.

·        The City has been (and will continue to be) in contact with the Province of Manitoba on the progress of the project.

Status – North End Sewage Treatment Plant


·        The approved 2013 capital budget (including the 5 year forecast – 2014-2018) for the upgrade is $501.45M.

·        Interim upgrades already implemented between 2006 – 2008 including effluent UV disinfection and centrate nutrient treatment for a total cost of $53M.


·        In June 2011, The Save the Lake Winnipeg Act modified sections of the Water Protection Act requiring the City of Winnipeg to submit a plan within one year to the Province of Manitoba for the plant upgrades.

·        In June 2012 the City of Winnipeg submitted the required plan.

·        The Province of Manitoba approved the plan on October 2, 2012, and required a detailed Master Plan be submitted in October 2013.  The City is on track and will submit the plan by the required date.


·        The project is proceeding in accordance with our submitted and approved plan and is estimated to be completed in the Spring of 2020.


 ·        The City has been (and will continue to be) in contact with the Province of Manitoba on the progress of the project.

Biosolids Status

·        The approved 2013 capital budget (including the 5 year forecast) for the Biosolids Management System is $165.64M.


 -        The Province of Manitoba requires the City of Winnipeg to submit a Biosolids Master Plan in October 2014 detailing how biosolids will be handled. The City is on track and will submit the plan by the required date.


 ·        The City has been (and will continue to be) in contact with the Province of Manitoba on the progress of the project


Other Levels of Government Funding

·        The total current estimated costs for the upgrades (completed and in progress) is $860.2M:

 
 ·        The Federal government has committed $42M for these upgrades.


·        The Provincial government has committed $25M for these upgrades.

·        The Provincial government has also indicated, in a 2007 throne speech, a future $206M contribution.

·        These current other levels of government contribution commitments represent 32% of the capital costs of the sewage treatment plant works (not including biosolids). 

The remaining 68% of the capital costs are currently proposed to be funded by City of Winnipeg water and sewer rate payers.

 

Categories: City Hall, Infrastructure, Sustainability, Waste Removal

City Snow Removal for those that can't clear a path from the sidewalk to the road due to disability

There is a provision for the City to make sure that those that are unable have a path cleared from the sidewalk in front of theirhome to the road (in the winter).  

People are only eligible for this service if all persons in the household are physically unable to do the work and there are no other options (family, friends, neighbours). 

For more information, call the City at 986-7623.

Q: What will the City do to help out?

A: The City to make sure that you have a path cleared from the sidewalk in front of your home to the road (in the winter).  


 

Q: What Will the City not do?


 

A: This service does not include the removal of snow on private property or a lane windrow after a back lane plow operation.


 

Properties with front approach access do not quality for this service.


 

Q: Do I have to Qualify?


 

 


 

A: Yes you have to qualify for the program, there are 3 criteria.


 

 


 

a)            The property owner/occupant has a permanent disability/handicap and is physically incapable of shoveling snow (copy of medical certificate is required for all new applicants).


 

This service is not provided for those with a short-term disability/handicap (eg. knee surgery).


 

 


 

b) No other able-bodied person resides in the property owner's/occupants house.


 

 


 

c) The property owner/occupant is unable to arrange to have this work done by others due to financial circumstances.


 

Upon request, application forms for this service are mailed to residents to be filled out and returned to our office along with a copy of a Doctors Certificate.


 

Where applicable, a By-law Enforcement Constable will personally interview the applicant to verify the above criteria.


 

 


 

Q: How do I apply?


 

A: Call 311, if you meet the above qualifications. 311 will submit the application information to the department who will then contact you for follow up on the Medical Certificate requirements.


 

 


 

If you do not meet these qualifications, there are many agencies that assist seniors and persons with disabilities.


 

 Q: Where can I go to find out about resources for seniors?


 

A: For more information on all types of services provided, not only snow removal, please call Community Home Services Project at 204-948-4392
or visit their website at
http://seniors.cimnet.ca/

 

 


 

 

 

 

Categories: Snow Removal

2013 Senior Snow Removal

 Snow Removal: There is a provision for the City to make sure that you have a path cleared from the sidewalk in front of your home to the road (in the winter).  You are only eligible for this service if all persons in the household are physically unable to do the work and there are no other options (family, friends, neighbours).  For more information, call the City at 311.

Q: What will the City do to help out?

A: The City to make sure that you have a path cleared from the sidewalk in front of your home to the road (in the winter).  

Q: What Will the City not do?

A: This service does not include the removal of snow on private property or a lane windrow after a back lane plow operation.

Properties with front approach access do not quality for this service.

Q: Do I have to Qualify?

 

A: Yes you have to qualify for the program, there are 3 criteria.

 

a)                 The property owner/occupant has a permanent disability/handicap and is physically incapable of shoveling snow (copy of medical certificate is required for all new applicants).

This service is not provided for those with a short-term disability/handicap (eg. knee surgery).

 

b) No other able-bodied person resides in the property owner's/occupants house.

 

c) The property owner/occupant is unable to arrange to have this work done by others due to financial circumstances.

Upon request, application forms for this service are mailed to residents to be filled out and returned to our office along with a copy of a Doctors Certificate.

Where applicable, a By-law Enforcement Constable will personally interview the applicant to verify the above criteria.

 

Q: How do I apply?

A: Call 311, if you meet the above qualifications. 311 will submit the application information to the department who will then contact you for follow up on the Medical Certificate requirements.

 

If you do not meet these qualifications, there are many agencies that assist seniors and persons with disabilities.

 

 

Q: Where can I go to find out about resources for seniors?

A: For more information on all types of services provided, not only snow removal, please call Community Home Services Project at 311
or visit their website at
http://seniors.cimnet.ca/

Categories: City Hall, Snow Removal

What is a Rumble Strip?

Rumble strips are a road safety feature that alerts inattentive drivers to potential danger by causing a tactile vibrations and audible rumbling, transmitted through the wheels into the car body. A rumble strip is usually either applied in the direction of travel along an edge- or centerline, to alert drivers when they drift from their lane, or in a series across the direction of travel, to warn drivers of a stop ahead or nearby danger spot. In favorable circumstances, rumble strips are effective (and cost-effective) at reducing accidents due to inattention. The effectiveness of shoulder rumble strips is largely dependent on a wide, stable shoulder for a recovery, but there are several other less obvious factors.

Categories: Alternative transportation, Infrastructure, Public Safety, Traffic

Why are rumble strips not used in Winnipeg?

Rumble strips are not being considered for use in Winnipeg at this time, for the following reasons:


1) The Transportation Association of Canada (TAC)’s “School and Playground Areas and Zones: Guidelines for Application and Implementation” does not recommend the use of rumble strips in school zones as a method to slow down traffic.


2) Rumble strips are ineffective once they become snow packed, especially when used perpendicular to traffic flow, as in school zone applications, making maintenance difficult or impossible during winter months.

3) Rumble strips are not easily traversed and are potentially dangerous, for motorcycles and bicycles, and are difficult to avoid when used perpendicular to the traffic flow, as in school zones.


4) Rumble strips, particularly those used perpendicular to traffic flow, as in school zones, are not effective over time in reducing speed.

5) Other jurisdictions, such as Calgary, where rumble strips were tested in school zones, received negative feedback from a large number of residents regarding vibration and noise generated by traffic traversing the rumble strips.

Categories: Infrastructure, Public Safety, Roads, Traffic

How was the name for the Parker Neighbourhood selected?

The search of the Manitoba Historical Society site found that Parker was named in 1882 for journalist Elizabeth Fulton Parker, who assisted in founding of the YWCA in Winnipeg, the Women‟s Canadian Club, and the Alpine Club of Canada (MHS 2014).